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High Noon (VHS)
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Customer Reviews:

  • A GENUINE CLASSIC!!
    HIGH NOON (1952-NR) stars Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly (her first role) and Lloyd Bridges and is arguably the best western of all time. Nominated for 7 Academy Awards and winner of 4. Also, AFI Top 100 of all time. Will Kane (Gary Cooper) has just said his wedding vows with his new bride (Grace Kelly) and is about to turn in his badge as sheriff and leave the town he had singlehandedly cleaned up, with his pacifist Quaker wife. As they're about to ride out of town in their buckboard limo, three tough hombres ride into town and let it be known that Frank Miller is arriving on the noon train-it's now 10:40 AM. Will leaves but just out of town turns around and comes back. He can't leave now. He's responsible for arresting Frank Miller and sending him up to prison. He was supposed to be executed but instead he's paroled and coming back to get even. Will believes he can round up a posse to defend the town during the next hour as the film progresses in real time. The plot is simple but the acting is terrific and the scenes are tight and tense as he tries to recruit help as well as keep his new bride. All this leads up to the showdown at HIGH NOON and the final, climactic scene-a great one. More than just a good western, there are some underlying themes of courage (and lack thereof) as well as the issue of pacificism and 'standing by your man'. This is the role that got Grace Kelly's career on track. One interesting note-on Netflix there's a commentary on issues for parents to judge whether a film is suited for children and what age. Under the category of SOCIAL BEHAVIOR it says "Women are exceptionally intelligent and respected". Apparently that was not the norm for films back then. Everyone should see this at least once. Recommended for ages 10 and over. WWW.LUSREVIEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM
    ...more info
  • New High Noon 2-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition due out June 10th, 2008!
    Lionsgate has announced a new DVD release of High Noon with new special features. There is what appears to be a reliable report, though unconfirmed, that it will include a new transfer of the film, restored by Paramount. The current and older DVDs are only of average video and audio quality.

    This a true classic, combining traditional Western themes with contemporary concerns about popular acquiescence to evil, done in a gripping, unusual (nearly real-time) way, with great actors.

    Town marshal Will Kane (Gary Cooper) is caught between his new pacifist Quaker wife Amy (Grace Kelly) and a felt duty to face down evil men coming on the noon train to take revenge on him (and presumably cause whatever other trouble they please). Most of the drama takes place in the lead-up to a climactic battle, as the townspeople choose whether to support Kane with action or to let him stand alone. Amy too must choose between her spouse and her own moral beliefs. The tension builds relentlessly as we see clocks ticking towards noon. The innovative black and white cinematography emphasizes the dramatic points, while the internal drama is captured in Cooper's face.

    The new DVD features are these:

    -- "Inside High Noon," a 50-minute documentary on the making of the film (see below for more on this)
    -- "Tex Ritter: A Visit to Carthage, Texas," on the Tex Ritter Museum
    -- the full performance of "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin'" from the Jimmy Dean TV Show

    The features carried over from the current release are:

    -- commentary with Gary Cooper's daughter Maria Cooper Janis, screenwriter Carl Foreman's son Jonathan Foreman, director Fred Zinneman's son Tim Zinnemann and Tex Ritter's son John Ritter
    -- "The Making of High Noon" featurette
    -- "Behind High Noon" featurette
    -- radio broadcast with Tex Ritter

    Whether the new features will warrant an upgrade is a matter of personal preference, of course. A 50-minute documentary could be quite interesting, if it's well done.

    It does sound interesting. The "new" documentary, actually made a couple years ago but shelved until now, is by film and Gary Cooper expert John Mulholland. It's expected to cover, among other things, the conflict between Cooper and John Wayne over the participation of the blacklisted screenwriter Carl Foreman. Given that the film is intended in part as an allegory of the public's acquiescence in the Red Scare, this will have more than the usual gossipy behind-the-scenes relevance. It includes interviews with three of the children of the principles who participated in the DVD audio commentary: Cooper's daughter Maria, director Zinneman's son Tim, and Foreman's son Jonathan. There are also interviews with Grace Kelly's son Prince Albert of Monaco, Western and film historians Brian Garfield, Lee Clark Mitchell, Stephen Prince and Meir Ribalow, and High Noon fan President Bill Clinton. The narration is by actor Frank Langella.

    Lack of agreement between Paramount and Lionsgate prevented the earlier release of a restored transfer and the documentary, in case you're wondering why this didn't come out before.

    (Amazon has a habit of removing or not even accepting outside links, but if you want to read more about this, some of the more interesting tidbits are from a discussion at hometheaterforum. Just do a web search for "high noon" plus "ultimate collector's edition" or "inside high noon" and such keywords to find the links--easy to find.)

    A parting note on the ethical side of the film. While everyone can appreciate the strength of Cooper's character and the contrast to the weakness of others, which is no doubt the intended moral focus, we can wonder why the seemingly parallel choices facing Will and Amy are treated differently, with one portrayed heroically for choosing perceived broader duty over duty to spouse, while the other is seemingly approved in doing the opposite (those who have seen the movie will be able to see how that is). I'm not sure writer Foreman saw that parallel as I put it here, and maybe there are good reasons to argue they aren't really parallel. It could be a statement about the limits of pacifism, or it could be a reflection of other cultural mores that Foreman didn't question. Or it could be largely motivated by the need for a certain kind of ending. I'm not a film historian, so maybe these questions have already been addressed. If so, feel free to leave a comment about it....more info
  • High Noon
    One The best movies ever. Gary Cooper was great in this film. The supporting cast was also very good. The idea of the real time length of the movie was great I also enjoyed the way the theme song was incorperated in the movie. Tex Ritter has been a favorite of mine for a long time....more info
  • Good, but not great
    I have been on a western "kick" over the past few months, and have watched dozens of films from the '50s and '60s. This film is the start of a genre ("adult western") in its own right, so is certainly a trailblazer, but falls woefully short of many that came after it. It would probably have been more suited for a 2-hour TV show than for the big screen.

    The plot is reasonably good, but the acting is shallow (there are many who could have done better than Cooper), and the bad guys could have been played better by a dozen or more others. The score is bad (if I hear that godawful theme song again...). The cinematography is mediocre for a Western. And, the political undertones are offensive to me; can't people keep politics out of ANYTHING?

    I will not add this one to my library. Instead, it will be full of John Ford, Sam Peckinpah, Sergio Leone and others who I felt captured the essence of the romanticized West....more info
  • Gift
    Never really saw it, gave as a gift to a friend that made mention of it about 10 years ago. ...more info
  • Very Satisfied
    I was very pleased with my order from this seller. I received it promptly and in better condition then was described. I will buy again from this seller. ...more info
  • High Noon is a Good Film---and Nothing More
    This famous film is modestly well done, but it does not rank among the best of all time. There are rumors that the makers of High Noon were subtly trying to comment on Joe McCarthy and the so-called Red Scare era. Gary Cooper supposedly was not a Western lawman forced to confront the bad guys all alone. No, he was actually a Hollywood left-winger being victimized by anti-Communist extremists. I am glad I finally saw High Noon. It was worth 85 minutes of my time. I can, however, only give it four stars. You probably should see High Noon for yourself. If nothing else, this movie's popularity demands a viewing during your lifetime. What do I know? The majority certainly disagree with me in this particular instance.
    ...more info
  • Among the Top 5 Westerns of All Time! What a Great Movie!
    This movie is more than 56 years old and yet it is still relevant and enjoyable today as it undoubtedly was back in those days. This is because the themes are recurring and just as it was then, it is still the same now with regards human nature. The parable of the Good Samaritan covers it and so does this wonderful classic film about the sins of omission being just as bad as sins of commission. Is it okay to let a man go to his death because it is none of your business or is it just as good as if you had pulled the trigger yourself? Here, Gary Cooper plays a very capable marshall who has managed to selflessly keep his town safe but when it comes to the marshall himself needing some help, the townspeople make up excuses to avoid putting themselves in danger when the marshall himself had been doing this on their behalf for years. How often do we commit sins of omission ourselves by making excuses to not do the right thing? This sad and sorry aspect of human nature was present in the parable of the good samaritan, this film and will probably continue to exist today and ever after.

    Cooper's performance is brilliant and he thoroughly deserved his Oscar for this film. People confuse courage with having no fear which is a mistake. Courage is doing the right thing especially when you are afraid and to do so the more afraid that you are, the more courageous you are. To have no fear ever is not courage but insanity. I especially love the part when Cooper admits to Bridges that he was afraid and yet continued to do the right thing. There are lots of lessons here that we can all learn that are timeless and for this reason, this film will continue to be a classic and relevant for ages to come.

    The only problem is with the DVD; the special features consist of a good but not great documentary concerning the making of High Noon. Although the sound has been THX mastered, the sound quality isn't noticeably much better and could have used a Dolby Digital 5.1 surround treatment or better. The picture quality is not very good either with imperfections ala white spots and vertical lines every couple of seconds or so of footage. Although I've seen worse picture quality on other dvds, you'd expect better for a classic film like this one. Here's hoping that with the advent of Blu-Ray, they will take advantage of the opportunity to properly restore the picture and improve the sound quality options.

    Great must-have movie in any film buff's library but you may want to wait for a much better restored version either in Blu-Ray or standard format....more info
  • high noon
    ONE OF GARY COOPERS GREAT MOVIES,THE OTHER IS THE HANGING TREE WHICH IS NOT AVAILABLE ON DVD.I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHY THIS MOVIE IS STILL NOT AVAILABLE ?????????...more info
  • Fantastic.
    High Noon (Fred Zinnemann, 1952)

    Note: here be spoilers. On the off chance that you haven't seen or heard anything about the movie, you may want to skip this review.

    There's a scene in High Noon that just makes it for me. It's pretty close to the end, right at the point where Will Kane (Gary Cooper) has realized that no one in town is going to help him fight Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) and his gang, and resigned to his fate, he leaves his office and heads up to the depot to confront Miller. As he walks down the street, the camera pulls away from him to an aerial view, but there's nothing smooth about the pullback; it's jerky and swerving and jolting, as if the whole town is about to fall down around Kane's ears, or as if to simulate what must be going on in Kane's stomach, or both. How often do you see that in a movie nowadays? (,he says just after writing reviews for No Country for Old Men and The Dreamers.) It's not so much the symbolism of the thing as the fact that it seems so natural, as if someone on the set said, "hey, we've got a pullback here, wouldn't it be neat if we did this with it...?".

    It's probably inexcusable for someone who fancies himself a media critic to have seen as few Gary Cooper movies as I have in my lifetime, but after finally seeing High Noon, I plan to watch a lot more of them. Cooper is as laconic as he is iconic, the plain-spoken good guy who realizes he's got a job to do whether anyone wants to help him with it or not. He comes off as a bit dour, which makes me wonder why his new Quaker wife Amy (Grace Kelly) would have married him in the first place, but that's a minor thing. Kane's demeanor sets him apart not only from the bad guys (and a fine batch they were-- MacDonald is backed up by country singer Sheb Wooley, prolific character actor Robert Wilke, and a young lee van Cleef), but from the townsfolk; not a coincidence, one thinks, especially given the film's oft-noted red scare subtext (the subtext that caused John Wayne to remark that High Noon was the most anti-American movie ever made).

    Honestly, now that I've opened that door, I can't see the red scare subtext as valid to criticism of the movie any more. It was half a century ago, and we all realize it was idiotic (at least, I hope we do). Ignore it when watching the movie now. There are so many other reasons to like the movie. Zinnemann's casting was dead-on for almost every role, even in the places where he ended up using his fifth or sixth choice for a role (Gary Cooper was far from Zinnemann's first choice for Kane, for example). Cooper and Kelly are fantastic, and their odd lack of chemistry is offset by the fact that the two have very few scenes together. The rest of the townsfolk are uniformly excellent, as is to be expected when one's talent pool contains such notables as Harry Morgan, Lon Chaney Jr., Lloyd Bridges, and Katy Jurado. Zinnemann's direction is excellent, coupled with Floyd Crosby's groundbreaking cinematography, which is played up quite nicely with Elmo Williams' editing (Williams is responsible for the real-time aspect of the film, which was originally meant to run a good deal longer; Crosby was the guy who figured out how to make the film look so sere. No, you're not watching a faded print). A number of very talented folks worked on this movie, and they all brought their A games. One for the ages. ****
    ...more info
  • You will remember this
    Coop's a little old and Kelly's a little young, but what the hell. A great film you won't forget, ever. And that's saying a lot about a movie....more info
  • A towering western except...
    HIGH NOON has always been one of my favorite films but several pieces of casting have always bothering me; not enough to ruin it but...

    Face it, Ian MacDonald (Frank Miller)is basically the answer to a trivia question. What if Lee Marvin had gotten off the train instead? Also, what if Strother Martin had played the town drunk and Jack Elam had replaced Sheb Wooley, joining Lee van Cleef and Robert J. Wilke, completing the triumvirate of great western villains? Gary Cooper would really have been in trouble.

    ...more info
  • Amazon DVD High Noon
    As ususal, Amazon had it, shiped and I received it in better than good order. I've never had a complaint....more info
  • HIGH NOON
    This Western black & white is Great.Should have been filmed in SPEIA..It woud give it the age of the ninteenth century play.
    New coming of age..Lee Van Cleef...not talking just his looks were BAD! The new actress-the beauitful & graceful,GRACE KELLY gave this western classic...class.Mr.GARY COOPER..gave it rugged
    and scare to continued to what could have been his last fight to live.Lloyd Bridges and all the rest of the supporting actors were just outstanding in their roles....more info
  • New High Noon 2-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition due out June 10th, 2008!
    Lionsgate has announced a new DVD release of High Noon with new special features. There is what appears to be a reliable report, though unconfirmed, that it will include a new transfer of the film, restored by Paramount. The current and older DVDs are only of average video and audio quality.

    The new features are these:

    -- "Inside High Noon," a 50-minute documentary on the making of the film (see below for more on this)
    -- "Tex Ritter: A Visit to Carthage, Texas," on the Tex Ritter Museum
    -- the full performance of "Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darlin'" from the Jimmy Dean TV Show

    The features carried over from the current release are:

    -- commentary with Gary Cooper's daughter Maria Cooper Janis, screenwriter Carl Foreman's son Jonathan Foreman, director Fred Zinneman's son Tim Zinnemann and Tex Ritter's son John Ritter
    -- "The Making of High Noon" featurette
    -- "Behind High Noon" featurette
    -- radio broadcast with Tex Ritter

    Whether the new features will warrant an upgrade is a matter of personal preference, of course. A 50-minute documentary could be quite interesting, if it's well done.

    It does sound interesting. The "new" documentary, actually made a couple years ago but shelved until now, is by film and Gary Cooper expert John Mulholland. It's expected to cover, among other things, the conflict between Cooper and John Wayne over the participation of the blacklisted screenwriter Carl Foreman. Given that the film appears to be in part an allegory of the public's acquiescence in the Red Scare, this will have more than the usual gossipy behind-the-scenes relevance. It includes interviews with three of the children of the principles who participated in the DVD audio commentary: Cooper's daughter Maria, director Zinneman's son Tim, and Foreman's son Jonathan. There are also interviews with Grace Kelly's son Prince Albert of Monaco, Western and film historians Brian Garfield, Lee Clark Mitchell, Stephen Prince and Meir Ribalow, and High Noon fan President Bill Clinton. The narration is by actor Frank Langella.

    Lack of agreement between Paramount and Lionsgate prevented the earlier release of a restored transfer and the documentary, in case you're wondering why this didn't come out before.

    Anyway, a heads-up for those looking to get this great classic film on DVD. Amazon is taking orders for the new edition here (where I've included my own observations on the film).

    (Amazon has a habit of removing or not even accepting outside links, but if you want to read more about this, some of the more interesting tidbits are from a discussion at hometheaterforum. Just do a web search for "high noon" plus "ultimate collector's edition" or "inside high noon" and such keywords to find the links--easy to find.)...more info
  • High Noon vs. Rio Bravo
    High Noon vs. Rio Bravo?

    Should we think of it as a competition when Rio Bravo was made as a protest against the way Will Kane had to go around the town looking for special deputies only to get turned down?

    The behind-the-scenes talk is that both John Wayne and director Howard Hawks had contempt for High Noon and the way its protagonist went looking for help to fight the bad guys. Guess these two guys never heard of the Second Amendment or even of special deputies or posses!

    Actually as stand-alone stories both movies have messages worth learning. One should see true life experiences in both of them. In High Noon the town's people all had excuses for why helping out their marshal wasn't good for them at the moment. Good thing the men who fought for us in the Revolutionary War didn't refuse to join the Army because they "got a wife and kids".

    And make no mistake, the U.S. Founding Fathers included the Second Amendment in the base of our political system as a way for the citizenry to remain armed in order to oppose tyranny. Now it may be true that they were worried more about tyranny from oppressive governments both foreign and domestic, but just how good would the people of Kane's town be against tyranny on a national scale when they couldn't even be bothered to stand up against it in their own back yard?

    In High Noon Will Kane eventually finds help from his own wife who comes to see that she owes more loyalty to her vows to her husband than to some goofy religious belief that says that to fight evil you lie down in front of it and spread your legs -- figuratively, if not literally.

    In Rio Bravo the sheriff says upholding the law is the job of professionals, then what does he do? Like his friend says, he employs a drunk and a cripple, and then decides he needs more help and looks to a teenager and deputizes the kid. LOL Said cripple, by the way, who so unprofessionally shoots and nearly blows the head off of a fellow deputy and can't even admit it when he made a mistake. ("How was I supposed to know the Dude was gonna go and git hisself duded up? Huh?... HUH???") And then when Feathers tries to sit guard in the lobby of the hotel and falls asleep Chance treats her tenderly for her effort and carries her off to bed. Looks like Wayne and Hawks couldn't make up their minds just what it was they believed! Sort of schizoid, IMO.

    Too bad for them, but no reason for us to not take away some important lessons from both of these movies, one of which is that it seems it is never comfortable or convenient nor can we expect the timing to be "right" when we are called upon to stand up against evil; and having one's personal demons going on inside is no excuse to bow out of the fray, turn inward, and forsake the common good....more info
  • Landmark Mature Western With Surprisingly Non Traditional Hero
    The classic 1952 version of "High Noon", is an exceptional film in so many ways and totally measures up to all the praise that has been heaped on it since it's first release. Brilliantly written, with many finely drawn characters, it was an amazingly adventurous production for the time in deliberately not fitting into the standard and much loved western formula of the evil bad guys wearing th eblack hats with the fearless and in control good guy with his white hat. Gary Cooper most deservedly won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his role here in "High Noon", and his hero never once fits into the good guy western hero stereotype. His Marshall is a very human man with his own very visible insecurities and fears and it is this intriguing multidimensional character and the very unexpected supporting characters that also dont seem to fit into the expected grove usually associated with westerns, that makes "High Noon", a viewing experience to treasure. Because the film is more about intense character studies than shoot 'em out action it can be easily enjoyed by both western buffs and by others seeking a fine drama about people and their many complexities...more info
  • High Noon still does not forsake you, oh my darlings...
    Some "classic" movies become such icons that everyone knows they've seen them but never watches them again because "everybody's seen that already." If "High Noon" is that kind of film for you OR if you've never managed to see it because everybody AROUND you has that impression, here is a great way to reaquaint yourself with a classic that is not only a barrier-breaking western, it's also a film classic regardless of genre and worthy of the term.

    Aside from the story of duty and how Gary Cooper's lawman feels obligated to stand up to the criminal who's coming to gun him down on the noon train (hence the title) the whole subtext of standing against prevailing opinion, germane in the McCarthy-ite 50's when this film was made, makes overall impressions beyond the plot itself. The vision of beauty that is the young Grace Kelly as his new Quaker/pacifist wife only adds to the enjoyment as do performances by supporting players like Lloyd Bridges and Katy Jurado and the later-to-be-made-famous-by-Spaghetti-westerns Lee Van Cleef as one of the badguy's henchmen.

    This restored and picture perfect edition also includes a short but interesting documentary on the making of the film hosted by movie historain Leonard Maltin that interviews most of the people involved in the film, and a SECOND little special feature talks with the surviving children of Cooper, Kelly, the director, producer, and other principal participants, including the late John Riter, son of singing cowboy star Tex Ritter who made a hit of the theme song---and WOW does GARY COOPER's daughter look, talk, and even move like him!

    Another interesting point made by the documentaries--"High Noon" was perhaps the first film ever made to use the technique of "real time"--it is almost exactly in synch with the actual minutes clicking down towards Noon and the many clocks in the film used to heighten the suspense are all in synch with each other--kind of a 1950's Western version of the modern TV hit "24" and unique for its time that way.

    "High Noon" is considered to be one of the greatest movies and westerns ever made for a reason. In case you forgot, or never knew, why, this version is the one to get and, I'm sure, watch over and over through the years. ...more info
  • A Teriffic Western and Study in Hypocrisy
    "High Noon" deserves its place as one of the top 100 American films of all time. Gary Cooper gives a powerfully restrained performance as Will Kane, a man of conscience whose decision to stand his ground against three outlaws results in the desertion of nearly everyone in his life. That the story is a thinly-veiled assault on McCarthyism is beside the point; it also serves as a reminder of the brittle patina of community that unites mainstream American culture. As in the typical modern suburb, the townspeople here go through the motions of civility, only to quickly devolve into me-first survivalism when their public notions of camraderie are tested. Told in "real time," the film hits all the right marks: great script, straightforward direction, "real time" pacing, and a haunting score by Dimitri Tiomkin (with vocals by Tex Ritter, who actually sounds like Gary Cooper singing, matching the sense that the songs are Kane's conscience). Supporting performances by Grace Kelly, Katie Jurado, Harry Morgan, and Lloyd Bridges (as a wormy deputy) are terrific, as is what amounts to a cameo by Lon Chaney, Jr. In fact, though audiences tend to remember most Kelly's role as Kane's conflicted wife, it's really Jurado's performance that stands out, as she ably plays the streetsmart Mexican immigrant who is shunned by the community (the subtext being that running the local saloon and brothel is the only work the community permits an "outsider" like her to do.) That films like "Rio Bravo" and the "Dirty Harry" series would essentially take the Kane character and give him a different political slant is a testament to the endurance of Fred Zinnemann's western outting. One warning: contemporary audiences expecting an action film may be disappointed to discover that "High Noon" is a drama with action overtones, meaning the film is a lot more than just over-produced gunfights and empty moral platitudes....more info
  • Best western ever?
    Could be the best for sure. This was a landmark film, unique in its portrayal in real time (or close to it.) This film took place over the course of a couple of hours, and the story is magnificent. Gary Cooper plays a terrific hero, and in this movie he has to be the hero alone for the most part. It doesn't stop him, and in the end he and his beautiful wife, Grace Kelly are able to live in peace. If you have only watched newer westerns you have missed out for sure. This is one of the best ever, and you won't mind at all that it's black & white. If you like Gary Cooper, westerns, or old classic dramas you will like this movie!...more info
  • High Noon high on my list.
    No self respecting collector of the western classic film genre should be without this cd. It ranks right up there with She wore a yellow Ribbon, The Searchers, Lonesome Dove, Bend in the River, Unforgiven, and Tombstone to name a few. Gary Cooper is at his best since his performance in Seargent York....more info
  • High Noon
    High Noon is one of the greatest movies ever made, and it stars Gary Cooper, one of the greatest stars and actors of all time. This is a movie you can watch over and over and never get tired of seeing it....more info
  • A 3-star release of a 5-star film
    First -- the film itself is a classic and justly deserves a five-star rating. This particular DVD release, however, may be a bit disappointing for some. The "collector's edition" features some film commentary and behind-the-scenes discussion, but almost all of it is focused on drawing parallels between the film's storyline and the hearings on Un-American acitivities that occurred about the same time the movie was made.

    While some comparison between the two is legitimate, the feature-length commentary virtually ignores other allegorical interpretations. What makes "High Noon" a classic is that, besides simply being a story about duty and integrity when the chips are down, it can represent different things to different people.

    If one is hell-bent on viewing it allegorically, one can find it representative of World War II, the Cold War, the war on terrorism, a conflict between the domestic and the foreign, a struggle for gender or racial equality, etc. etc. Heaven forbid one should simply like it as a story of a good guy whippin' the bad guys.

    But to view its symbolism only within the confines of a parable about internecine politics is narrow-minded and diminishes its status as a classic work of photographic, dramatic, and narrative art. Very little is said of these aspects of the film in the course of the commentary; the conversation always comes back to the Hollywood blacklist. I would like to have learned more about how this or that technical problem was solved, and less repetitive annotation about Carl Foreman's political persecution.

    So to sum up -- great movie, and no doubt many will be delighted with this release, but the collector's edition may not be for everybody. A no-frills version may work just as well....more info
  • High Noon Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly
    This is an excellent film made in the 50's starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly. This is the collector's edition which is in my opinion much more enjoyable because it goes behind the scenes> Gary Cooper's daughter is the host along with the Director's view. The film is very good quality black and white and the story line is excellent. The music "Do not forsake me Oh My Darling" is sung by Tex Ritter. Beautiful movie all the way....more info
  • My husband's favorite movie
    High Noon is one of my husband's all time favorites. It's got some terrific lines in it. He's always quoting one of them. I bought this for his 71st birthday and he watches it at least twice a month. We like the fact that in the day and time this movie was made, foul language was unacceptable! Oh, that this was true today! It's a "must see" movie and worth every penny to buy it....more info
  • Classic Western in Glorious Black in White!!!!!!!
    This is for sure one of the best westerns ever made-remastered in great Black and White--the documentaries with it are great and worth the time to look thru-Gary Cooper and the beautiful Grace Kelly were excellent in their roles. It was interesting seening Lloyd Bridges playing the Deputy--what a young man he was in this picture in 1952! Get this for your collection!!!! ...more info
  • 3 stars out of 4
    The Bottom Line:

    A movie that has been romanticized and over-analysed way out of proportion (if it's a McCarthyist parable, than pray tell, which character represents McCarthy?), High Noon is a solid western with a good performance by Gary Cooper, but it's neither the second coming nor one of the best movies ever made...more info