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Jane Eyre
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As an orphan, Jane Eyre is far from happy. She endures the hatred of her aunt and cousins, but finally begins to find some pleasure as a teacher. When she becomes a governess working for Mr Rochester, Jane hopes she might at last have found love and kindness.

Customer Reviews:

  • My All Time Favorite!
    This is the book that hooked me on reading! It has everything that I enjoy reading about: strong female characters, mysterious and preternatural occurrences, secret romances, and indelible love. ...more info
  • It's Jane Eyre, sir

    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • Stands the Test of Time
    Charlotte Bront? skillfully weaves together a memorable study of a woman's life, from childhood to adulthood, and of the unique challenges she faces. Jane Eyre is a wholly unprotected young woman, forced to make her way in the world in the only position she can respectfully acquire: that of a governess. Bront? herself was a governess and understood the distinct misery such a situation can cause. A governess in the Victorian age was a woman in social limbo: she was held to be above the station of the servants, meaning she was not accepted into their society (it would appear insultingly condescending on her part), and yet underneath the status of the family, who would shun her. A governess was one of the loneliest women in the world. Luckily for Jane Eyre, she is welcomed into the limited society at Thornfield and is even held in affection by her young French pupil. However, her world is turned upside-down upon the return of Mr. Rochester to his home. The bond between the tortured master and his young, inexperienced governess is strong and immediate, and the passion that grows between them is inevitable and consuming.

    I would not dream of spoiling the delicious mystery and dramatic plot by saying much more. One can easily get carried away when discussing this book. I will say, however, that the book is beautifully written, if somewhat preachy, and the characters themselves are remarkably believable. No one is perfect in this book. Mr. Rochester is domineering, Jane herself is a little too morally strict for modern tastes, and many of the other characters, most notably St. John Rivers, have obvious flaws. This all combines to make the story, which is fiercely romantic, much more accessible than it otherwise could have been. I believe that any reader of both Victorian literature and modern romances and mysteries will enjoy this enduring classic....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • Excellent rendition
    Amanda Root does an excellent job of bringing the story to life. She seems to truly understand the message Charlotte Bronte communicates in her superb dialogue. This is my favorite audio CD. Amanda Root's telling of the story does not sound like someone reading from a book, but rather like someone living a life. I highly recommend this audio book....more info
  • A timeless Gothic masterpiece.
    Some modern readers may find it hard to believe that this little Gothic novel created quite the scandal in its day. The novel is based on an orphan by the name of Jane Eyre, who is raised by her aunt, the cold-hearted and cruel Mrs Reed. Jane's early childhood is one marked by violence and neglect. Early on, however, the readers learn that little Jane Eyre has a fiery spirit that refuses to become a victim of its oppressive enviroment. She boldly lashes out at those who mean to demean her and constantly remind of her station in life.

    When Jane fondest wish comes true, she leaves behind her wretched existence at Gateshead House and arrives at Lowood school. Jane's life at the orphan boarding school proves just as trying as her time at Gateshead. Behind the walls of Lowood, Jane suffers many privations and witnesses many acts of cruelty. She remains at Loowood for eight years, first as a pupil then as a teacher. Jane's urgent need for change prompts her to seek a position as a governess. She finds such a position at Thornfield Hall, the home of Edward Rochester, who the narrator falls deeply in love with.

    The character of Jane Eyre is extremely modern. Readers today will have little problem identifying with her thoughts and wishes. Although of low social standing, Jane speaks her mind to those who mean to subdue her. She reminds her aunt of her promise to look after her when she abuses her as a child. She defies the teachers at Lowood. She refuses to become Mr Rochester's mistress. Jane choses her own happiness over what is expected of her, not a very attractive quality in women in Victorian society, but one modern readers can sympathize with

    Charlotte Bronte used several personal life experiences as inspiration for this novel. Like Jane, Charlotte attended a boarding school, where she experienced many of the tribulations Jane suffered. The death of Helen Burns at Lowood from tuberculosis was inspired by the death of her sisters Elizabeth and Maria, at The Clergy Daughter's School from the same disease. Jane Eyre is one of the best classics. It's dark and tragic, yet emotional and even amusing at times. Definitely one of my favorites. ...more info
  • "Dark and Twisty" As My Good Friend Would Say

    I really want to tell you what happens because I thought it was so good! But of course I won't because it would spoil it for you.

    I will say that I have been avoiding 'the classics' for a good long time (except for The Scarlet Letter which I actually enjoyed way back in High School). And I'm thinking maybe it's been a mistake. If only every book could be as wonderful as this one. I really loved it.

    My copy of Jane Eyre has an introduction by Joyce Carol Oats and I would caution those who don't know this story; do not read the introduction! It will spoil the story. Thankfully I didn't read it until after I finished the book and I am so glad, it tells everything that happens!

    Jane never forgets that she must love and respect herself first and foremost. She is clever, direct, honest and true to herself even when holding true to her principles costs her dearly.

    It is a gothic story, dark and heartbreaking full of love, devotion, obsession, isolation and oppression. Bronte creates a wonderful symmetry and balance within this story, I loved it, it moved me to tears.
    ...more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • This Particular Version
    I will leave the telling of Jane Eyre to some of the other reviewers. This particular version is my favorite. This is the cloth bound version or the book with the lovely attached ribbon bookmark. This is a very lovely version of this book....more info
  • None Like It
    I consider 'Jane Eyre' to be one of the greatest works of art ever achieved. Certainly better than almost any other work of literature and on a par with Michelangelo's 'David' and Beethoven's Fifth Symphony....more info
  • Best Book in the World!
    Jane Eyre is my favorite book. I love it.
    I read it first when I was 10, but it did not appeal to me at all, so I stopped reading it. I tried a year later. It immediately became my favorite book. I have read many other good books too, like Rebecca, but Jane Eyre is #1! I have recommended it to all my friends who love reading. This book is very great for someone my age (12) who is not bored with descriptive writing. (I've read worse.)
    You should definitely try this book! ...more info
  • I was surprised by how interested I became in the story of Jane Eyre. I had to read it for my college English Lit class.
    Through out my many years of being a student there have been good and bad books that had to be read for class. Jane Eyre in no way is one of those bad books. I had to read Bronte's novel for my college English Lit class and at first thought it might not be that interesting seeing as it was written over 200 years ago. The story of Jane Eyre pulled me in and found myself thoroughly interested in what happened to her. I now know why Jane Eyre is such a classic novel and is still being read today. The character of Jane Eyre is very strong, however she keeps most of who she is to herself due to her class in society. She becomes a sort of female detective and finally discovers where she is meant to me in the end....more info
  • Wonderful!
    Jane Eyre is never a disappointment. Bronte really can touch your heart with the struggles of the main character. A woman in the post-modern era could have easily been in the same situation. Bronte put forth a completely time-less quality in this book. If you have the patience, it can keep you nailed to your seat!!...more info
  • this is what a romance should be...
    Anyone who has read Jane Eyre will be more than ready to assert that there is more to this novel than just a protracted love story. There's the issue of class boundaries, marriage, faith and religious zealotry, self-realization, the circumstance of women in Victorian times, and so on. But being a self-confessed simpering romantic, I have no choice but to focus on my favorite theme.

    I loved Jane most whenever she's in the company of Mr Rochester, or even when she's just thinking about him. Somehow, for me, she becomes quite fervent, feels more human and behaves more womanly. Plus, I loved the fact that the author fully expressed in words the love that Mr Rochester himself feels for our eccentric heroine--so passionate, in fact, that I think some readers may gag at the "syrupy-ness" of his avowals. Not for me though. In fact, I feel a sort of regret that such emotion from a male character is rarely encountered in romance novels nowadays.

    Though a bit rough for me to begin with, Jane Eyre, as both the novel and the woman, became engaging as the story progressed. Dark, emotional, often dialectic, at times drily humorous, this story is sure to be remembered for a long while....more info
  • Lovely classic
    *Spoiler alert*
    I'm not a big fan of romantic works. I don't remember reading Mills & Boons or Harlequin romance novels. Chick-literature annoys me. I distance myself from Oprah's Book Club recommendations since they are mostly chick-lit or 'truimph of the human spirit' kind of fluff. The closest i've been to romantic literature is Jane Austen and Bronte sisters. Pride and Prejudice and Wuthering Heights are romantic, but there is much more to them than just snagging a nice, rich guy and marrying him. Until yesterday Mr.Bingley was my favorite romantic character of all time. He had an exceptional character, an intelligent mind and a devil-may-care disposition- the three things i admire most in a man. But if Mr.Rochester and Mr.Bingley were to be pit against each other today, i'd choose Mr.Rochester.

    Pros:
    I never imagined that I would enjoy Jane Eyre as much or even more than Pride and Prejudice. I just couldn't put the book down. The story is trite. It was probably novel in those times, given that the book was written over 170 years ago. To this jaded modern soul it would have been just another governess romance, if not for the brilliant writing. The narrative flows like a stream gushing over. Bronte's description of everything is very detailed. But it builds up the anticipation just so. One wouldn't expect to rave about a story of a governess in love with her master but too poor to profess it to him. That's the power of good writing. A good writer can create a large tome about something really mundane and it is still likely to attract a dedicated following.

    Reading it transported me to that time and place. I felt for Jane Eyre's poverty and lovelessness and admired her strength and endurance. Mr.Rochester's torment over something very common and normal in our times was heart-wrenching. I could relate to Bessie's nonchalant affection for Jane, Adele's childish enthusiasm and Mrs.Fairfax's lack of ingenuity. I adored Diana and Mary, though they were pretty much superfluous to the book, and disliked St.John for his evangelistic attitude. His contrived ideas of marriage and service to God were infuriating. I believe that one who truly loves God, loves man unconditionally, seeing God in him. But St.John clearly seperated God, man and eternal heaven and with that he just rubbed me the wrong way, despite his remarkable character and a refined mind. He was also way too stoic for my liking.

    As cliched as it was, i was really glad that it ended with Jane's marriage with Mr.Rochester. And the way she announced it was sheer pleasure. "Reader, I married him" was music to my ears.

    Cons:
    My only grouse is the way Bronte crippled Mr.Rochester in the end. It was fairly sad and entirely unnecessary. Despite that, it was a wonderful read....more info
  • It's not Austen or Emily Bronte, that's for sure.
    I guess I compared this book to Austen's Mansfield Park. The climax of the book happens too early. I was bored with most of the book, as it does not keep you entertained with clever dialog like Austen. It does not grip you as Wuthering Heights grips you and takes you in from the beginning.

    It is a great story, told with a boring type of writing style at times. I was bored with about the first third of the book. Only when she meets the master of the house and his odd personality does it become interesting. Gothic story telling at it's best, with a shocking climax.

    This is not my favorite Bronte book, nor my favorite Charlotte Bronte book. It is just plain boring in narrative at times. The overall story is a good one and that plain or ugly people fall in love and they are not all beautiful. That in the end, her lover pays a high price for what he's done and she is forgiving of him.

    It's a great ending and a great story, if you can get through a third of the book to enjoy the rest. It's too wordy to keep you on edge like Wuthering Heights, by her sister Emily. The hero of the book is not realistic to what men are really like. It's woman's version of what women would like a man to be.
    ...more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • illustrated ebook
    Jane Eyre - Illustrated novel by Charlotte Bronte

    This ebook is a golden treasure to add to your library. A beloved classic and remarkable work of literature....more info
  • Jane Eyre Audio CD
    It is really nice for traveling to "read" as you go, also it was nice for a busy daughter who had to read it for HS assignment!
    ...more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • A Visit With the Past
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte was our book club selection for this month. It is a book I had not read since I was in high school. Now I can't believe that at one time I plowed my way though the extravagant prose, it must have been because the selection of other romance books was limited.
    Our edition was large print, for which I was thankful and as a recommendation I'd suggest a condensed version.
    Writing style have changed since 1848, but one item of interest. Early in the book Miss Bronte describe the characteristics of the development of a serial killer as graphically as any modern thriller.
    Nash Black whose titles are available in Amazon Kindale editions.HaintsSins of the FathersWriting as a Small Business...more info
  • Please Skip Erica Jong's Intro!
    What can I say about this beautiful classic that hasn't already been said?
    My only word of caution: DO NOT READ THE INTRODUCTION if you've never read this book before. Ms. Jong feels the need to fill you in (spoil is more I like it) on several key details/events that any hungry reader would rather devour on their own. Skip her....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • Jane Eyre
    This is a beautiful love story about not so beautiful people. Which makes it even better. I really think it's one of the best books around in this genre. Some of the lines are priceless and the interaction between the two main characters is charming and yet painful at the same time. It's young love at it's very best. Bittersweet and oh so good....more info
  • Just one word - Superb!
    This is one of the best readings of this book I've heard - and I've heard (and read) the book many times. I strongly recommend this for fans - especially if you're looking for a CD to listen to during a trip, when you can hear most or all of it at once....more info
  • The Model for the Modern Historical Romance
    It seems silly to say that a book can affect you on a profound level. well I definitely believe in this power that a good book has. Jane Eyre is one of them. I cannot say that this was an easy book to read. But it was a book that I was very enriched by reading. Romance is a genre that is looked down on by many "sophisticated readers." Perhaps they would look down on Jane Eyre, but would probably get some eyebrows raised at them. Well Jane Eyre is the archetype for the romance novel. After having read thousands of them, I know a romance novel when I see it, and Jane Eyre does qualify. But it is much more than this. It's a story for the person who wonders why the keep trying to do the right thing, and persevering in life, instead of just taking what they want when they want it. If Jane Eyre had been that sort of person, she would not have gotten her happy ending. Instead, Jane walked away from the thing she wanted most in the world. She almost died doing what she felt in her heart was right. Had the story ended there, I probably would have detested this book. But it doesn't. We see Jane continue to grow and act as the phenomenal person that she was. Although often downtrodden, she is no meek mouse. She has a fighting spirit that keeps her going when others would have laid down and died. But despite being a fighter, she is not a user and abuser. It's hard at times for the difference to be clearly delineated. Well there is no question about Jane's level of strength and intregrity. Although it is made clear several times in this novel, that Jane is no beauty, her soul makes her a beautiful character. Beautiful in a more profound way.

    There are moments when you feel, how can one person suffer so? But taking the journey, you realize that all Jane's suffering had a purpose. It refined her into a woman who could look beneath and love what others could never love or understand. It made her the woman who could love and heal Rochester.

    At the same time, Rochester was made for Jane Eyre. He had searched his life for a woman like her, and made quite a few mistakes along the way. And out of love, he was able to let her go when he wanted to keep her. But she came back to him, when he needed her most.

    Rochester is the hero that formed the archetype for many of my favorites: tortured, scarred, dark, enigmatic, all of those things. Best of all, loving little, plain, ordinary Jane with a fundamental intensity that pours out of the pages of this book into my heart as a reader. Despite his lack of perfection, I could not love him more.

    Ah, how maudlin I sound. I can't help it. This book moved me to tears. Yet I smiled at the same time. I enjoyed the conversations between Rochester and Jane. There was a heat there, a passion. Yet this book is clean enough to read in Sunday school. That is grand romance. The journey so well expressed, that no sex scenes are needed. It's all there.

    This novel is also inspirational. Not preachy, in my opinion, but for a believer, one can definitely find spiritual messages in this book. About perseverance, about not wearying about doing good. About the profoundness of God's love. It's all there, but in a narrative that expertly showcases it, not preaching it.

    I feel I am failing to write the review I want to write for this book. The words do fail me. All I can say is that this book will always be a favorite of mine because of the way it touched my heart and challenged me.
    ...more info
  • buy this edition
    If you're thinking of reading Jane Eyre, and you want to understand it, this edition is the one for you. The footnotes are very helpful, explaining the allusions to the Bible or older literature that you might not pick up on, as well as some of the vocabulary. The contemporary reviews in the back are great - everyone must read Elizabeth Rigby's review. Our culture has changed so much, we don't understand how revolutionary books like Jane Eyre once were. The essays of modern criticism are also very helpful. Someone did a very good job with this book.

    A few reviewers wrote that Jane Eyre is not entertaining or something. Actually, it is if you understand it. To me, Jane Eyre is up there with Shakespeare, the Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye as some of the deepest, most well thought-out stories I know of. It is a book to read 2 or 3 times before you draw your conclusion.

    So - in short - read Jane Eyre, and use the Norton Critical Edition.
    ...more info
  • Touching
    Jane Eyre / 0-451-52655-4

    Unlike many of the classics, which contain a superb message under vernacular that is sometimes hard for us to read, Jane Eyre still flows easily to our ears and eyes, and the plot is gripping and suspenseful.

    While Jane may seem, to our modern sensibilities, to be something of a weak heroine in her jealousy of her master's suitor, her insistence upon actual marriage in spite of the cruelty of the situtation, and her weak acceptance of her missionary suitor's almost vampiric leaching of her spirit (in spite of his own sisters' exhortations to stand up for herself, no less!), Jane is still a strong and modern female in light of the standards of her own day. Her bravery in taking up her post as governess in a strange land, her 'presumptuousness' in courting (or being courted) by her master, her daring in considering to be a missionary's wife, and her final decision to set out again in search of her lost love all point to a strength of will and character which would have made her character - at the time - to be quite 'mannish' indeed! We can admire Jane her strength and will, while marvelling happily at how far things have come, and wonder hopefully at how much farther they may yet go....more info
  • STILL HOLDS UP BEAUTIFULLY...
    ...after 160+ years.

    THE STORY:

    I read Jane Eyre every 3-4 years because its truly the grading curve for so many writers of the genre. There are times even now when I read the book and I'll say to myself, "I LOVE this book!"

    When you think of the date in which it was written in and the author's limited worldly experience and resources, you can't help but appreciate her sharp wit and thoughtful insight into each character. In addition to that, Bront? has a way of transporting you into Thornfield's dark eerie halls alongside Jane. It's truly a remarkable story!

    THE BARNES AND NOBLES CLASSICS EDITION:

    As for this particular edition, for quite some time I had been encouraging a friend to read Jane Eyre. The compact size was perfect for her to carry around in her bag for long grocery store lines, commuter rides, etc. She finished all 608 pages in one day because she loved it! It also has a great introduction filled with historical and bibliographical information on Ms. Bront? to truly transport the reader into the mind and time of Jane Eyre.

    **If you simply want more Mr. Rochester and Jane after reading this, I suggest seeing the 1983 Timothy Dalton/Zelah Clarke made for TV version by the BBC. Out of all versions (and I've seen all) it is the TRUEST adaptation of Bronte's work and doesn't dumb down her beautiful prose (what the author is most famous for) with modern day slang, nor does it take liberties with Bronte's Mr. Rochester and Jane Eyre to bring them down to Hollywood's standards. The strong characters you fell in love with while reading her book, are the same strong characters in this wonderful screen adaptation. Bronte would be proud as was this reader/viewer. ...more info
  • Better than I expected
    This novel was quite a bit better than I expected. I usually prefer adventures ("manly" literature) but quite frankly, this book didn't disappoint me. I don't give it 5 stars for the convoluted way that Jane and Rochester get back together. The "I heard your voice in the wind" stuff is a little hard to swallow. (Sorry if that was a spoiler! Still read the book because there are some true heart-pounding moments!) Jane Eyre was actually quite enjoyable to read and I'm glad that I took the time to read it. I like her character: She's not beautiful, but she's a solid and determined woman and I like that her inner beauty overcomes her physical plainness. She's a role model for young girls! She overcomes adversity with strength and determination and has an accurate moral compass. She follows her inner voice and she's rewarded for it. Great female literary character of the 19th century!...more info
  • I could not put this book down!
    I bought this book about 10 years ago, and I did not read it till last year, i could not put this book down, This book is so relevant to a woman's heart, to the human being's gemotions, What I love about Jane Is that she always kept fighting through all her trials and never let hate poison her heart, always made the best of everything. I bought the miniseries from BBC, I recommend Pride and prejudice and sense and sensibility by Jane Austen to those who love this genre.Nobody writes this way anymore!...more info
  • An enjoyable read
    Jane Eyre was a clever book that brought you through the twists and turns of her obscure life. Beginning from childhood, Jane was faced with the choices of life which lay before her. She moved from struggle to struggle with courage and self-determination which gained the reader's respect. Her character is strong and clever in a way that brings her to be a heroic personage in the novel. I liked how Jane obtained a strong-willed personality and how she stuck by her beliefs no matter what.

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this slower paced romance from beginning to end and like many other books of its kind, it captivated me with the beloved mixture of romance and challenge. I liked how there was a fair amount of lovey-dovey moments in the book which held your attention, and made you strive for more. It wasn't a constant shower of romance and flirtatious quotes, and this I found, allowed the reader to excite themselves whenever the romance was present.

    Charlotte Bront? used a lot of descriptive imagery throughout the novel ranging from the texture of light to the precise emotions Jane was feeling. This seemed to make it easier on many levels to comprehend exactly what was going on at every point of the novel. Although it had a few sluggish parts, I found was no struggle to read through those select scenes. The beginning of the book had a slow start, but I believe it was necessary to set up the stage for the rest of the novel. As a final comment, I'd like to simply state that I really enjoyed reading Jane Eyre.
    ...more info