Nikon WT-3A Wireless Transmitter for Nikon D200 Digital SLR Camera
 
List Price: Too low to display

Our Price: Too low to display

You Save:

 

Product Description

Nikon delivered the first integrated Wi-Fi system for digital SLRs with the WT-1a for the D2H. Nikon then advanced Wi-Fi technology, speeds and ease-of-use with the WT-2a for the D2X and D2HS. Nikon's wireless system has elevated the way photographers do business in commercial advertising, fashion and wedding photography. Newspapers and magazines are leveraging wireless functionality, delivering remote action sports photography. Combined with Nikon Capture Control and the new Capture Control Pro software, Nikon stands alone offering a complete wireless remote solution, allowing photographers to remotely control their cameras from a computer, further extending system versatility. Nikon is pleased to announce the delivery of the new WT-3a Wireless Transmitter, featuring IEEE802.11 b/g technology, along with easy-to-use and set up Transfer, PC and Print modes. The WT-3a enhances handling characteristics and control functions offered by the MBD200. Powered by a single EN-EL3e battery and providing functionality, a vertical shutter release button as well as front and rear command dials, the WT-3a delivers much more than outstanding wireless technology and performance. The WT-3a allows D200 photographers expanded system versatility. TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) and AES encryption for the Infrastructure mode provide increased security for file transmissions

Features:
  • Simple operation for setup and device registration, including nine device profiles with supplied Setup Utility software.
  • Network functions include Transfer, PC and Print modes available for image transfer, remote operation via Nikon Capture and Capture Control Pro software, and wireless printing with the PD-10 Print Mode adapter
  • IEEE802.11 b/g wireless LAN supports FTP and PTP-IP protocols with effective transfer rates up to 10 Mbps, newly available in the ad-hoc mode
  • Built-in wired (LAN) 100BASE-T Ethernet capability with automatic cable detection offering an effective transmission rate of 15 Mbps
  • Built-in antenna provides a range of operation up to approximately 256 feet, while the optional WAE1 Extended Range Antenna can accommodate transmissions up to approximately 840 feet
Customer Reviews:
  • Nikon WT-3A Wireless Transmitter for Nikon D200
    Nikon needs to help the public with this one. Its well constructed but not user friendly. It would take a software engineer to get it to work......more info
  • Too slow, but you could use it...
    If you shoot RAW only, forget this thing. If you shoot RAW+JPEG and you configure it to only transfer the JPEG, then it could be a nice tool to show previews to customers....more info
  • Not what I expect from Nikon
    I have been a Nikon shooter (serious amateur and semi-pro) for 8 years. This is the first Nikon product I am returning. As a software engineer and networking specialist, I discounted the reviews saying this product was tough to set up. They were more than right: in 2 days of trying I could not get it to work with my network; a new experience for me.

    Also, the quality of the product hinges on 3cm of external USB wiring you do not see in the images. It gets in the way, cannot be replaced, and would break easily, in my opinion. Further, once attached you now have 2 power switches to remember to turn on!

    For me, this product is very sub-par. I could not make it work, and it does not measure up to the engineering quality I associate with Nikon products. ...more info
  • Once it's set-up it works flawlessly
    I'm a pro photog and have owned Nikons since 1985. I had a little problem at one point. I originally set it up using the auto-assign to link it to my 17" Mac G4 Powerbook. Worked great. Then a couple weeks later I noticed an update available for the WT-3a software, so I d/l'd it and loaded it (just because I like to be up-to-date and I wanted to add a couple more configurations I needed to use).

    All of a sudden I couldn't get it to connect. First I want to say that I have NEVER had better tech support than what I got from Nikon - and it's 24/7! They rock. Anyway, to make a long story short, after dumping the old config and setting it up with manually assigned IP addresses it has worked flawlessly ever since. Tip: To do it manually, just pick any two IP's within the same range; save an Airport peer-to-peer (computer-to-computer - whatever you want to call it); name them the same; budda bing.

    Side note: I shoot in Raw+Basic L-jpg (D200) and I found the time-to-display solely using Camera Control Pro a little slow (5 to 10 secs) (BTW, I use it for shooting product both in my studio and on-location - great client impresser!). I find that setting CCP up to send it to PictureProject for display is much faster; it sends the jpeg first so you get a view in under 3 seconds. Also, be sure and remove the CF card or what happens is it writes to the card BEFORE sending it wirelessly to your computer, thus increasing your wait time. Remove the card and that interim step is eliminated.

    Yeah, a bit overpriced but a great device! Don't leave it on the camera when you're not using it. The exposed USB is vulnerable to damage. If you like the bigger feel in your hand, as I do, buy the MB-200 battery pak for field shooting; it's worth it for the extra battery life anyway. It uses up one battery before moving to the second - I carry a third and change it out when the first battery goes or gets low.

    Cheers and remember, it's the Light that's magic! Work The Light baby! An hour after sunrise it's pretty much over until and hour before sunset!...more info
  • Becareful when using with intel Mac OS
    Could never get this to interface properly with my Mac laptop or Imac. The tech support at Nikon really put in a tremendous effor tto get it right but to no avail. I would have to say that perhaps because I'm using OS 10.4.10 the Nikon software wasn't compatable. Other than the unit being way overpriced, if it worked I would have kept it. Nikon software with Mac OS's seem to always have issues....more info