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Sandworms of Dune
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Product Description

At the end of Frank Herbert's final novel, Chapterhouse: Dune, a ship carrying a crew of refugees escapes into the uncharted galaxy, fleeing from a terrifying, mysterious Enemy. The fugitives used genetic technology to revive key figures from Dune's past--including Paul Muad'Dib and Lady Jessica--to use their special talents to meet the challenges thrown at them. Based directly on Frank Herbert's final outline, which lay hidden in two safe-deposit boxes for a decade, Sandworms of Dune will answer the urgent questions Dune fans have been debating for two decades: the origin of the Honored Matres, the tantalizing future of the planet Arrakis, the final revelation of the Kwisatz Haderach, and the resolution to the war between Man and Machine. This breathtaking new novel in Frank Herbert's Dune series has enough surprises and plot twists to please even the most demanding reader.

Customer Reviews:

  • Nice backdrop to the story, but not quite up to snuff - spoiler
    The authors plod along with the obvious plotlines. The big question to me was how were the famous gholas going to save the day - well, they dont. Actually, they are totally irrelevant to the plot. Duncan Idaho is the new Kwitzach Haderach? Its like a bad James Patterson ending where we think Paul is going to step up, but he chokes, so we move to Leto, who sort of does something, and then Norma comes in as superwoman and solves the day out of nowhere. Why did she wait so long?

    In spite of the wierd plot, I loved the series. My affection for the characters carried me through. I know if you have read all the others, that you have to wrap it up with this one, so enjoy, but dont worry about the plot....more info
  • Quantity, Baby
    I never really had much of an opinion about these Herbert-Anderson books until now.

    It took me FOREVER to finish this book--I was bored to tears 3/4 of way through. This begs the question: Why two volumes?

    The problem with so many characters is that they ultimately become disposable. Moreover, there is not a whole lot of emotional investment in the Herbert-Anderson writing style, which is a very bad thing considering all the emotionally-charged situations that occur in the Dune universe.

    I big thing missing (for me) was a description of how the characters are thinking and feeling in very specific situations. Instead it's all very watery, often delivered with a single low-calorie paragraph before moving on.

    The ending was pretty satisfying, if a bit rushed. It confirmed a suspicion I had about a major character. The writing definitely improved towards the end, which makes me suspect it was based more on Frank Herbert's original outline (if that makes sense).

    Reduce it to a single volume, drastically reduce the number of characters, and add some emotional punch. That, I believe, would be a more satisfying read.

    Found only one typo....more info
  • A worthy finale of sorts
    Some fans of the original Dune series tend to dismiss these new novels as bastardized versions of the original. I wholeheartedly disagree. These books are far more accessible, can be breezed through, and most importantly, fill in the gaps from the Dune Universe.

    This book ends the main story of Dune, and while there are other Dune books that will be developed, they will most likely be small, almost irrelevant branches as opposed to continuing the timeline.

    So the first question is, does it solve all the lingering issues? The clear answer is yes. Is it a good read? Yes. The style is readable, fluid, and fun. As usual though, the chapter structure takes away from the quality, as each chapter is a mere few pages long, so sub-plots are split up needlessly, and subplot information is needlessly repeated as new chapters have to explain what happened in older chapters.

    The main problem of the book is that some of the subplots, especially the internal strife within the ship, are often boring and completely useless. The robot empire behaves in an almost comic way. I almost stopped reading when a robot was discussing Van Gogh as it was so laughably bad.

    Basically, the first 400 pages are nearly useless. Out of a 500 page book, that's just not good. You could literally pick it up from 400 and suffer little to no break in continuity. Fortunately, it does go by quick.

    However, the last 100 pages more than make up for it. Without getting into specifics, it's an interesting ending that wraps up the final conflict between computers and humans, and it tells you who the true the Kwisatz Haderach is. While many people may find the ending weird, stupid, or confusing, I found it quite satisfying.
    ...more info
  • Entertaining space opera that lacks Frank Herbert's invention as a novelist
    Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's Dune novels have much more in common with the atmosphere of "Star Wars" than Frank Herbert's Dune novels. Sandworms of Dune like Hunters of Dune its predecessor was based on an outline for the novel to follow Frank Herbert's Chapterhouse novel. Sandworms is certainly entertaining although both books should and could have been condensed into a single compact novel and been much more effective. This is the kind of book you pick up at the airport and use to pass the time--it isn't enlightening nor is it great literature but it is diverting.

    Duncan Idaho and the refugees that escaped at the conclusion of Chapterhouse continue to fly into uncharted space attempting to evade the creatures and Honored Matres that are trying to capture Idaho. Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother Sheeana has used cells collected from some of the most notable figures in history to clone gholas in aid them in their fight against either of their enemies if needed. This includes Paul Atraides, his mother Lady Jessica, Stilgar, Thufir Hawait and Miles Teg among others.

    Meanwhile, the Mother Commander Murabella continues to integrate the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood with factions of the HHonored Matres preparing them for war. Murabella finds her followers fighting among themselves almost as often as they are fighting the Honored Matres who refuse to join them as well as unexpected plagues that begin to ravage the inhabited worlds.

    Uxtal one of the last remaining Tlielaxu masters finds himself forced to work undercover for a group of Face Dancers that are infiltrating the humans. Uxtal is forced to recreate one of the old Tlielaxu masters Waff in attempt to discover how to make spice in without sandworms now that the planet of Dune has been destroyed.

    The Dune novels that Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson have written are diverting and entertaining but lack the resonance of Frank Herbert's original novels. Frank Herbert's novels examained a number of difficult themes from addiction to humanity's obsession with messiah myths and the political consequences of both. These sequels are like any film franchise--they aren't truly about extending and examining the same themes but about the entertainment value. From that perspective Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's novels are successful and while they do try to examine many of the same themes from Frank Herbert's novels they aren't quite as successful. Frank Herbert's style could often be stilted. Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's style veers towards the opposite extreme--it's simplified for folks that love to read Star Wars novels and other franchise fiction. There's nothing wrong with that if that's what you're looking for but fans who read these Dune novels will be disappointed.

    Hunters of Dune and Sandworms of Dune are both entertaining diversions and while they lack the invention and serious themes that drove Frank Herbert's novels, they are, at the very least, entertaining space opera. ...more info
  • sandworms of dune
    i have only read half the book todate but it is by far there best so far highly recommended cheers ian...more info
  • A page flipper for sure
    I do not claim to be a Dune enthusiast, but I do enjoy reading Science Fiction novels and Sandworms of Dune caught my eye in the bookstore. The authors do an excellent job of describing the characters and the scenery. The reader is sure to have a good sense of how everything appears, while observing the characters develop at a moderate pace. The ending is surely a surprise, and it wraps up many of the scenarios developed in previous books. Gholas of several key Dune characters are involved in the main story, and it essentially takes off decades after the escape from Chapterhouse. Leto II, Jessica, Alia, Scytale, Yeuh, Paul, Channi, and several characters make a re-appearance. The Ultimate Kwisatch Haderach is revealed towards the end and it's quite a surprise since I never expected it. I am unsure of why there are so many negative critics of this book, but it will surely please Sci-Fi readers.

    One thing that I found myself doing often was imagine the Bene Gessurit and Honored Matres to be more attractive than what many artists depicted in artwork, and how the Bene Gessurit were portrayed in the movies. I imagined Murbella, Janess, and Sheanna to be rather attractive "supermodel" heroine/secret agent figures like the ones you see on television serials (Alias, Chuck, etc...) with a full set of hair and high heels... certainly not scheming bald-headed evil women with dark leather clothing....more info
  • Intriguing.
    A good effort to continue the story. I was particularly pleased to see so much character development for Yueh, whom I've always felt deserved a little compassion and a chance for retribution....more info
  • Sandworms of Dune was lacking
    Sandworms of Dune was good insofar as it finished the story. We, the readers, now know the general chain of events. Apart from that, Sandworms of Dune, isn't that good of a book, IMO. One of the things I loved about Dune was Frank Herbert's writing style. It was deep, descriptive, and it helped to create this whole new world. Sandworms of Dune doesn't feel deep and the text isn't too descriptive. Instead Sandworms of Dune ends up feeling like fan fiction: it moves the story along but some things don't match.
    -The Bene Gesserit of Sandworms of Dune is nothing like the Bene Gesserit of the Dune books, new sisterhood or not.
    -The whole 'oracle of time' thing just seems absurd. In a series that that focused on political power and the power of humans, having this super-being just seems odd.
    -Why the gholas? In Heretics and Chapterhouse, they played a very important part. Here, they're mostly along for the ride.

    In the end, Sandworms finishes the story, and maybe that's all that matters, at least to some.

    ...more info
  • John@SanAntonio
    I'm sorry that the series has ended. Started after the father died. Read Brian's first. What a "phenomenal" series. Sandworks is a great ending. It finalize the 30 some years of great reading. ...more info
  • The Golden Path trails off to a Golden Arches-esque conclusion...
    I wish there were two categories for reviewing this book... If I were judging it on its own merits, as a stand-alone book, based on my level of enjoyment of it on its own steam, I'd say it fully deserves the three stars (maybe even four or five) that I rated it.

    Except, it's not a stand-alone story. It's the conclusion to the greatest science fiction, social/religious/political/historical-commentary tale of all time. As such, I'd rate it at 2-stars.

    As anyone who's read the original, six-part "Dune" series knows, the elder Herbert's seminal work is a fully-nourishing, intellectually-satisfying gourmet feast for the mind. In comparison, "Sandworms," and it's predecessor "Hunters" are like mental fast food-- they went down easy, tasted great, and made you want to go back for more, but were not terribly enriching nor ultimately satisfying as were the originals, especially as the lifetime-awaited conclusion to FH's phenomal, epochal tale.

    According to the younger Herbert and his literary sidekick Anderson, these books were based on an outline left behind by the late Frank Herbert.

    While I'm glad they wrote them and finally relieved the 22 years of suspense created by the "Chapterhouse" cliffhanger, compared to the elder Herbert's well-grounded cynicism toward the "superhero mystique" and his distrust of all demagogues, superheroes, religious figures and charismatic leaders, the comparatively saccharine, "Let's all hold hands and sing Koombaya"-ending in "Sandworms" seems highly unlikely to have been what Frank Herbert originally intended. I wouldn't be surprised if Anderson and the younger Herbert made up the notion of the long-lost Dune 7 outline in the interest of lending credibility to these last two books-- "wrapping themselves in the myth-fabric" of the original Dune series and such.

    I don't know if Brian and Kevin have ever specified HOW strictly or loosely these books are based on the elder Herbert's notes, but the ending they wrote seems to abruptly unravel the tightly-woven philosophical fabric of the original series.

    It's also a little strange to me that the ending so closely parallels the ending to the "Matrix" trilogy...

    While I'm not entirely satisfied with the conclusion to the Dune Chronicles, I am nonetheless glad it was written. The son of Frank Herbert has certainly proven himself as a capable literary artist in his own right, despite having inherited such a heavy mantle from his father. I can't imagine that he didn't find the prospect of completing his father's amazing, world-changing work to be somewhat daunting, and so I hope critics like me haven't been too hard on him. His father's was a tough act to follow, and I don't have any ideas for how he could have done it better. I wouldn't be disappointed, though, if he took another try someday, and wrote a more fitting conclusion to the saga of Dune. ...more info
  • I'm a HUGE fan of Dune!!
    This is the much anticipated 'end' to the Dune series, following a sequence of events after ChapterHouse. I can hardly bring myself to put a Dune book down when i'm reading them. They're all awesome, both the ones by Frank Herbert and the ones by Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson. The series gets a little 'weird' after the end of the Children of Dune book, but if you liked the books past Children of Dune you'll love the series finale. Don't forget to read all of the 'prequels' written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson, you need the background of those books. Everything is explained as you go, but still it helps to have some history....more info
  • Is that a sandworm in your pocket? Or is it DOON III?
    Or just another B. Herbert- KJA bomb? I have to give them props, they really tried hard...to make the longest most dragging high expectations in two books that I almost thought this book was going somewhere. It almost does. Where it fails miserably, is that the lucky charms leprechaun comes in at the end, saves the day, and everybody lives happily ever after. Of course, I'm being facetious, but the climax was almost that simple. There I was, eagerly anticipating a real battle, only for a POOF magical solution in the end. A lot of this book seems like a Dune parody, especially as the Baron H seems more like a villain out of Scooby Doo than the wickedly evil persona we all know and hate. Some questions are answered in here, like what Leto II's golden path was, although not very clearly. Neither is the purpose of bringing the Jews out of hiding, there really isn't a reason to put them in the story. Weaker yet, is Murbella's role, especially in her thinking that she is solely responsible for saving the human race, her character was completely destroyed by these guys. The issue with axlotl tanks, never resolved.Thanks for wasting my time and money. Even after lowering my expectations as much as possible, I still found disappointment. I don't hold the original Dune series sacred, but the climax of this book is its lowpoint. I'll be sure never to read another one of the Herbert-Anderson DOON collaborations....more info
  • If you like the previous Dune Prequels, than you'll probably like this, too
    I am quite torn when it comes to comparing the expanded Dune Universe as imagined by Brian Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson...on the one hand, taken entirely alone without comparing the books to the incomparable Frank Herberts works, they are actually entertaining and worthwhile reads...I believe, and I could be wrong here, but it seems to me that for a large number of reviewers, they simply cannot separate these new novels with the writing style of Frank. Let me be honest, when the first expanded novel came out, I was pretty harsh--at first. I can't say what it was that helped me to come around, but somehow I did.

    Now that ISN'T saying that I consider Brian and Kevin the Second Coming of Sci Fi greatness--nope. I'm just trying my best to give an honest review, based on how I view the storylines. It's similar to comparing the late Robert Ludlum to Eric Van Lustbader who has started writing Jason Bourne novels--when compared directly with Ludlum's novels, they fall rather flat...however, when taken individually on their own merits, I found that I enjoyed them much more.

    The additions of Dune Characters from old was a bit of a surprise for me, and I have to admit that I enjoyed their inclusion quite a bit more by the end of the novel than I at first thought I would. I can see some VERY valid points regarding plot holes (some large enough for a Sandworm to slither through...) identified by some reviewers, as well. My problem is that with some sci fi series, if the plot doesn't hold water, I get mighty upset--and yet with others, I don't seem to care nearly as much--if at all. Can't say why, either. I think that these new Dune novels bring out the part of me that doesn't care as much--again, don't know why, but I just can't invest that much of my time worrying about stuff like this (and yet I lose sleep over the dumbest things, so take it for what its worth).

    I have to say that overall, in the novels I have read by Kevin J. Anderson, with the possible exception of his Star Wars books, I've found his writing to be decent enough, and I don't think I've read anything by Brian (other than these Dune prequels) so I can't comment much on his talent, other than to say, for MY money, I found myself thrilled at re-entering the world so incredibly created by Frank Herbert all those years ago. I also agree with one reviewer who lost more interest with each of Franks Dune releases...I just kept hoping that he'd re-capture the magic of the original 1st three books, and in my opinion, it just never happened. That isn't to say that I didn't enjoy them, just not as much. Let's face it, Franks worst writing is better than the vast majority of the best works by most Sci Fi authors--and that includes ALL of them (just MY opinion).

    Suffice it to say that if you did not enjoy the other KJA and BH expanded Dune novels, you simply will not like this one--however, if you DID like them, I honestly believe you will find a lot to enjoy here as well. Take that into consideration, and I think you will be a little better off. Hope this helps!...more info
  • Misunderstand Frank Herbert's originals
    The book directly contradicts facts established in Frank Herberts originals. Not trivial bits, but major plot points such as who and what important characters are, rewriting the background for the universe, etc.

    What is worse is that it makes a mockery of the themes Frank Herbert explored in his originals: Where they discussed the problems of handing over decision-making to mechanical things and power structures, the new books talk of an evil robot trying to eradicate mankind for no apparent reason.
    After Frank spent 6 books demolishing the hero archetype, charismatic leaders and our dependency on them and warning us about 'putting all our eggs in one basket' as a species, this book applauds religious fervor to incite mankind to band together under a single leader.

    If you liked Frank Herbert's work for the multilayered plotting, believable characters, well crafted universe and themes of humanity, politics and overall philosophical approach to science fiction - you will feel your fond memories violated.

    If you thought Dune was an action novel with a few draggy bits but a lot of lasers, giant worms and ¨¹ber-cool heroes and villains - then you might enjoy this and other KJA&BH work. You would also be wrong......more info
  • Too thick to be a children book
    I had no great expectations when I bought this book. One can't mimick Frank Herbert unless he is the Kwisatz Haderachthe or the awakened Frank Herbert himself.
    Nevertheless, the novel is full of ridiculous mistakes, paradoxes, impossible time-line and a whole lot of dramatic climaxes, not to mention an army of heroes yet not even a single solid protagonist. It's a mess.
    The writing is swift but unlike the original Dune saga it has no philosophical value. It's basically a book for kids who got used to thick and glossy books, the Harry Potter kind of stuff. Pity.
    ...more info
  • They delete reviews with fewer stars
    Well now that the pleasantries are concluded let me warn not to buy this after all because this is the most dreadful piece of writing that could ever come out of a computer printer. It is simply ghastly. I would recommend that even if you get this from someone as a gift you skimp on toilet paper and use this book instead.
    To be fair, I actually thought Legends of Dune was entertaining, and even Hunters wasn't too bad, it was actually decent B sci-fi writing- if you have nothing better to do than turn the pages and turn your brain off you will enjoy it. This book was different, this book made me want to vomit. The characters do asinine things far too often that are not only destructive but totally out of character. Even a poorly trained lab rat would make better decisions than the characters in this book: "There is a spy on the no ship, his name is the Rabbi go stop him" Duncan: "uh, whats a spy? What a rabbi? Oh no, owe owe, help I have been betrayed." Please. Not only is the writing bland and predictable, with a dreadful ending, you will be lost while walking through the novel. Honestly, Waterworms? Magical Norma? Paulo Paul fights normal Paul? Mighty morphing power worms? A paranoid prophecy seeking robot bent on destruction through not using destructive weapons? 8 different Deus Ex Machinas? Good Lord, you can't even imagine how horrible this book is. The great themes of dune are spat on, plot lines truncate suddenly, characters are badly mismatched not only from Frank's Dune, the last book, and even earlier in this book! The authors did no rereading of lore and didn't bounce a single idea of anyone else, instead one afternoon they sat down and plungered this book through the literary pipeline to a store near you. Don't read this book, don't buy this book and don't support this book. Go buy the original and send a message that you wont tolerate cheap literary diarrhea! ...more info
  • This can't be what Frank had in mind.
    "Sandworms of Dune" (SoD) is such a mess it's hard to know where to begin.

    Billed as the second half of "Dune 7," Frank Herbert's proposed final novel of the classic Dune series, SoD picks up after "Hunters of Dune" with the passengers of the no-ship Ithaca looking for a new homeworld while evading Marty and Daniel -- the elderly couple who were revealed to be the artificial intelligence Omnius and the cross-dressing thinking machine Erasmus. So yes, to understand who Marty and Daniel are, you have to have read Kevin J. Anderson's Legends of Dune prequel books, because they were never mentioned in Frank Herbert's original series.

    After a series of meaningless events, which includes the complete waste of the original series gholas, the novel ends with the defeat of the thinking machines, the realization of the Ultimate Kwisatz Haderach, the disappearance of Omnius and the Oracle of Time, and the death of anything remotely resembling Frank Herbert's themes.

    As you can tell, I'm not a fan of SoD. I think Anderson and Brian Herbert totally misinterpreted the themes that Frank Herbert had written about in the original Dune series.

    For one, Frank Herbert showed in "Dune Messiah" how charismatic leaders and supermen can be detrimental to a society. He also wrote about how humanity being ruled by one force could face extinction in "God Emperor of Dune." Yet, Anderson and Brian Herbert chose to end the Dune series with humanity and the thinking machines united under the Ultimate Super-Duper Kwisatz Haderach/Evermind.

    Another issue is that of the Golden Path. According to the original books, the Golden Path was the centuries-long plan that led to the Scattering, an explosion of humanity throughout the universe. The God Emperor believed such a spreading of human beings throughout multiple galaxies -- in addition to genes that make people "invisible" to prescient visions -- would insure the survival of humanity. However, in SoD, we learn that the God Emperor was a fool. The Scattering, according to the new books, was a failure because the thinking machines had humanity surrounded and it took the Oracle of Time (an Anderson and Brian Herbert character from the Legends of Dune series) to save humanity.

    In the end, SoD fails on so many levels I could write a 10-page review. Instead, I will just say that fans of Frank Herbert's original books will not enjoy this book. It lacks the intelligence of Frank Herbert's novels and turns the Dune universe upside down.

    It's unfortunate that a ghola of Frank Herbert can't be made to finish the Dune series....more info
  • It's a rerun of previous books....
    Gholas to the left, Gholas to the right...this book could have been phoned in and probably was. When the franchise is over, it's over....library this book....it added nothing to the mythology at all....more info
  • The Dunes Creep
    Afer awhile, the story begins to drag and tries to throw everything in but the kitchen sink. Frank Herbert's Dune (The original Novel) was so much more than the sum of all its parts. Here, the story meanders aimlessly onward, trying to serve up a big whopping finale, trying to appease those fans whose imagination have gone lacking. The finesse of government, religion, industry, Machiavelli intrigues and the slavish addiction to a rare commodity has never been equaled or surpassed. Sooner or later, all things end. it is time to let go before this series is ran into the ground....more info
  • Worth the read, but one of the least enjoyable of the "new" books
    I've read or listened to every one of the new Dune books, and most of the original ones. I've enjoyed both the old and new, although most would agree that the new has a different style than the old. This book, along with the previous book, Hunters of Dune, was an easy read, despite being over 600 pages. It was worth reading, but the entire book just seemed a little too "convenient", like the writers knew they had to wrap this thing up and they were running out of space to do it in, kinda like they were reading a bedtime story to a kid who was about to fall asleep and didn't want to have to finish the story the next night. It was very predictable and I basically had all the twists figured out pretty quickly. All-in-all, it was an okay book - worth reading just to see how the story ends up, but definitely one of the weakest in the series - new or old.

    ...more info
  • awesome
    brian herbert ended the story of all sci-fi stories in the world created by his father frank herbert. i absolutely loved this book though i thought the ending could hav had a different end to it, but nevertheless the story was as gripping as reading the original dune. so indepth w/ the continuing story left off from chapterhouse and hunters of dune. any sci-fi fan who has never read a single dune book has to absolutely read this series, the prequels give the reader so much more detail of who the characters are and how they became who they are. ...more info
  • Money Changes Everything - SPOILERS!!
    Sandworms of Dune is a book by Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson. I am going to tell you now, it is just a stepping stone to the next series of books that these 2 have planned for the Dune Universe.

    The 2 have created the gholas of all of the favorites Dune characters from the original series, and have done almost nothing with them in this book. This includes Paul, Lady Jessica, and Chani. I cannot imagine bringing these beloved characters back, and hardly using them at all.

    Conversely, Dr Yueh is brought back as a ghola, and is used extensively.

    I like the writing style of BH/KA. One of the flaws of the Original Dune was the writing style of Frank Herbert. One would have to read and re-read what he was trying to get across. Heretics of Dune, for example, is almost an incomprehensible book because of Herbert's writing style.

    I think it is good...Yes good...that the Thinking Machines are Daniel and Marty from Chapterhouse: Dune.

    But I agree with a previous reviewer. There is a fairy-tale like quality to some of the plot resolutions in Sandworms.

    Erasmus, the kinder, gentler Thinking Machine, flips a mental switch, and every Face Dancer dies in the Universe!!? Norma Cenva shows up, and banishes Omnius forever!!? Weird.

    But the merging of Erasmus and Idaho is fantastic.

    I suspect that these 2 crazy [and money-hungry] Dune authors have other sequels up their sleeves. Like Idaho/Erasmus fighting Omnius when he escapes from the Other Universe; or something like that. But honestly, are you glad to be gotten rid of the Tlielexu? I know I am....more info
  • A decent book ... if it wasn't a Dune book.
    Let me just say that living up to Frank Herbert's legacy would be a daunting and impossible task for anyone. The pressure that his son must have felt writing these books must have been incredible. It's really unfair to hold him to the same standards but, that said, this IS a Dune book so the comparison must be made, unfair or not.

    The book would be a decent SF novel, in my opinion, if it was not a Dune book. The writing is not sharp or insightful and the plot lacks both finesse and, even worse, doesn't make much sense (especially at the end). Still, it is more than adequate when compared to a host of other novels on the market.

    The problem really is that this is a Dune novel. The characters are all supposed to be extremely intelligent and insightful. The threats they face should be extremely formidable and well thought out, the victories hard-fought and bittersweet. Religion, politics, and human psychology should be at the forefront of the story, all played out against a landscape of brutal insight where everyone (including we, the readers) realize that the world must be seen for what it is, and never for what we wish it to be.

    The Bene Gesserit betray their emotions as though they were hormone-drunk teenagers, making ridiculous decisions and comments without any of their usual insightful quips. None of the supposedly disciplined characters in the book are very good at controlling themselves or of properly accessing the world around them. Instead of subtle comments with multiple meanings, words used with a beautiful economy of motion, sharp as razors, the characters can't keep from repeating the obvious, over and over again, and all have forgotten, it seems, the power of silence. They all operate at the mental speed of a somewhat gifted fetus, but only on their good days.



    Another thing that bothered me was the ending. The entire concept flew in the face of some of Frank Herbert's original Dune concepts and, to be blunt, made no sense at all. One line, for instance, says: "Just because a man's legs will grow stronger by walking, should we deny him a vehicle?" The answer is, of course: OF COURSE WE SHOULD! One of Dune's most powerful concepts is that humanity must develop human talents, without any crutch to stunt our development and evolution. While the short-sighted man may strive to make his life peaceful and without conflict, he is doing little more than destroying his potential. "I must strive always to avoid going down the easy-path. That way lies stagnation and death." This key concept is abandoned, at the end, in favor of trying for a "trick" ending of some sort. It seemed contrived and ran contrary to one of the underlying messages of the entire original series. (Another example of the original concept is the Golden Path, by which humanity was guided into the Scattering, a time of horrible trial and death but necessary as it sent humanity so far across the galaxy that no one event could ever threaten the species again)

    Sorry that this is so long. I do not wish to belittle the authors as what they attempted to do is probably beyond most everyone, but I wish that they had tried to keep to Dune's tone and flavor much more than the did. The series deserved that much, at least. I wish them success in the future and am sure that they will do much better work provided their own stories to tell....more info
  • Great book perfect condition
    A perfect conclusion to the Dune saga leaves you wishing it would just go on forever....more info
  • Interesting, but doesn't feel like a Dune novel should
    This review is difficult to write because there are many things about "Sandworms" that I really like, but there are too many things wrong with it to call it "great". Instead it is just pretty good.

    First, the good: As a Dune fan I kept reading in part simply because I wanted to see how the authors would attempt to finish Frank Herbert's epic story. For the most part I was pleased with the way that most of Herbert's original characters are portrayed, referring to Duncan Idaho, Sheeana, Teg, Murbella, etc. While the dialogue is sub par in places, I was convinced for most of the book that Frank Herbert originally envisioned these characters. I thought the story was fairly well done for about the first half, with just enough intrigue and excitement to be worthy of Dune.

    Now, the bad: This book, along with "Hunters", is ostensibly based on Frank Herbert's outlines, but I wonder how detailed those outlines were, because there are just too many things that seem bizarre when placed in the Dune universe. First, I really didn't like having thinking machines as the Enemy that Herbert envisioned. In particular, the specific characters of Erasmus and Omnious are the authors' creation from the earlier trilogy, and I can't help but feel like they brought them back just to play with them some more. They don't feel like they have anything to do with Dune; they make they book just like any other sci fi novel.

    But the biggest pitfall is that the story tries to be too epic. There are way too many characters who are supposed to be important but don't really do anything (Alia, Leto), plot points that are pointless (ultraspice, morphed worms), and I was really annoyed by the fact that most of the gholas end up doing nothing significant and are either killed off or drop from the plot some other way. The ending wraps up way too quickly, neatly, and bizarrely for such a complex story.

    In the end, "Sandworms" is fun to read and is exciting at times, but there were too many seemingly random and preposterous story points to call it a fitting end to the Dune saga. Rather, it is a book that you would read once and appreciate, but likely not turn to again.
    ...more info
  • As Enraged as an Honored Matre
    Wow. This novel (along with Hunters) was simply awful, plagued by a childish writing style and uninteresting plot developments. I was very disappointed with this work.

    Seaworms? Honestly? You mean to tell me that after thousands of years of experimentation in sandworm propagation, that a half-baked Tlielaxu was the first to think of such a thing? What was the point in doing this? the seaworm plotline was unnecessary for this tale, and does much to diminish the worm mythology.

    The rest of the story reads like an unbearably protracted curtain call for all the most famous characters of the Dune universe. The re-introduction of many of these characters was pointless, and contributed little to the development of the story. Such extreme disappointment. I would have preferred a beautifully illustrated coffee table book, containing prints of Herbert's actual notes. Harumph. I would wager that they wouldn't have much in common with this novel as it was published.

    Stop milking the cash cow, at let the beauty of the original Dune novels stand on their own. Fellow readers, avoid the temptation to buy this book just to satisfy your craving for a hint of melange. Instead, find an old, beat-up copy of God-Emperor somewhere, and reacquaint yourself with the real deal....more info
  • Intriguing.
    A good effort to continue the story. I was particularly pleased to see so much character development for Yueh, whom I've always felt deserved a little compassion and a chance for retribution....more info
  • Entertaining space opera that lacks Frank Herbert's invention as a novelist
    Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's Dune novels have much more in common with the atmosphere of "Star Wars" than Frank Herbert's Dune novels. Sandworms of Dune like Hunters of Dune its predecessor was based on an outline for the novel to follow Frank Herbert's Chapterhouse novel. Sandworms is certainly entertaining although both books should and could have been condensed into a single compact novel and been much more effective. This is the kind of book you pick up at the airport and use to pass the time--it isn't enlightening nor is it great literature but it is diverting.

    Duncan Idaho and the refugees that escaped at the conclusion of Chapterhouse continue to fly into uncharted space attempting to evade the creatures and Honored Matres that are trying to capture Idaho. Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother Sheeana has used cells collected from some of the most notable figures in history to clone gholas in aid them in their fight against either of their enemies if needed. This includes Paul Atraides, his mother Lady Jessica, Stilgar, Thufir Hawait and Miles Teg among others.

    Meanwhile, the Mother Commander Murabella continues to integrate the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood with factions of the HHonored Matres preparing them for war. Murabella finds her followers fighting among themselves almost as often as they are fighting the Honored Matres who refuse to join them as well as unexpected plagues that begin to ravage the inhabited worlds.

    Uxtal one of the last remaining Tlielaxu masters finds himself forced to work undercover for a group of Face Dancers that are infiltrating the humans. Uxtal is forced to recreate one of the old Tlielaxu masters Waff in attempt to discover how to make spice in without sandworms now that the planet of Dune has been destroyed.

    The Dune novels that Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson have written are diverting and entertaining but lack the resonance of Frank Herbert's original novels. Frank Herbert's novels examained a number of difficult themes from addiction to humanity's obsession with messiah myths and the political consequences of both. These sequels are like any film franchise--they aren't truly about extending and examining the same themes but about the entertainment value. From that perspective Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's novels are successful and while they do try to examine many of the same themes from Frank Herbert's novels they aren't quite as successful. Frank Herbert's style could often be stilted. Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's style veers towards the opposite extreme--it's simplified for folks that love to read Star Wars novels and other franchise fiction. There's nothing wrong with that if that's what you're looking for but fans who read these Dune novels will be disappointed.

    Hunters of Dune and Sandworms of Dune are both entertaining diversions and while they lack the invention and serious themes that drove Frank Herbert's novels, they are, at the very least, entertaining space opera. ...more info
  • Too thick to be a children book
    I had no great expectations when I bought this book. One can't mimick Frank Herbert unless he is the Kwisatz Haderachthe or the awakened Frank Herbert himself.
    Nevertheless, the novel is full of ridiculous mistakes, paradoxes, impossible time-line and a whole lot of dramatic climaxes, not to mention an army of heroes yet not even a single solid protagonist. It's a mess.
    The writing is swift but unlike the original Dune saga it has no philosophical value. It's basically a book for kids who got used to thick and glossy books, the Harry Potter kind of stuff. Pity.
    ...more info
  • More of the Dune Universe
    After reading all of the Frank Herbert Dune series, I have become addicted to the richness of the Dune Universe. Brian and Kevin have done a spectacular job of pushing out the edges of that universe....more info
  • Entertaining but not too deep
    Some of the negative reviews made me hesitant to pick up the book and finish off the story, but I'm glad I did. I certainly wouldn't call this a great work of literature on its own, but I did find myself engrossed for the couple of days it took to read the book. It's a fast-paced action-adventure built into a mythological masterpiece universe. But it doesn't add much to the original work other than finishing up the loose ends of the story line, even if the conclusions were a bit too "happy ever after"...

    I think in retrospect the big flaw in Brian and Kevin's work is that they decided to tell the story of the machine wars through the prequels. It could have been much more intriguing and mysterious to have used the Butlerian Jihad as a slowly developing back story to what Duncan and the Sisterhood were facing in figuring out how to deal with "the Enemy"...I suspect that is how Frank would have handled that information. The sisters had "other memory" after all. And Brian and Kevin REALLY missed an opportunity to give the rest of the characters a huge Ah HAA!! in understanding what Leto II was trying to do as the Tyrant.

    So though I found the book to be entertaining and worthwhile, I do agree with one thing some of the more negative commenters suggest: The series should end with this book. It has all been said and played out......more info
  • Entertaining, but lacking
    I was looking forward to a better "Dune" book . It's been over twenty five years since I first read Frank Herbert's "Dune" back in high school back in the 1980s. Every other Frank Herbert work in the "Dune" series was also quite good.

    Brian Herbert has taken his father's place in developing the final "trilogy". Like his prior book ("Hunters of Dune"), I still have the same complaints: a more tightly-written work could have been made, but he's busy weaving his own ideas from his prequels into this finale.

    As I said before, the "Dune" legacy deserves a conclusion that rates better than "okay". It's good reading, it's just not as entrancing as his father's writing....more info
  • I wonder at how much Frank Herbert outlined.
    Brian Herbert, supposedly, was asked by his father to continue the series and, according to Kevin Anderson, to flush out the Butlerian Jihad story with some prequels, so they did. However, when it came time to complete the actual series (Hunters and Sandworms)they clearly were still stuck on the Butlerian Jihad storyline they had created. They use the characters and plots they created in the prequel and superimpose them into the storyline here. The mysterious Daniel and Marty become Omnius and Erasmus, characters created by BH and KA in the prequels, and the storyline becomes saturated with the Butlerian Jihad. Plus all the gholas! A Paul ghola? Seems unlikely since he died millenia ago and you need the person's cells but ok. But Yueh, Hawat, Gurney, Chani, Alia, Stilgar, Leto II, Liet (died in a spice blow how'd they get his cells?) Baron Harkonnen?!, Serena Butler?! etc. It just seems silly and unnecessary. Did the authors ever ask themselves, "is this getting out of hand? We're just reviving everyone for little real reason." The whole work seems like a silly mess that is transparent in it's flaws. ...more info
  • Bad.....Yep, Bad.....
    First -- they stretched one book over two. Bad move -- makes for a drawn out slow read. Second, it's just not that good.

    There are a lot of opinions comparing Brian and Kevin to Frank Herbert. It's not fair -- Frank owned this material and he nailed it. Brian and Kevin are tackling someone else's work and, while I have enjoyed their other work, it does show through.

    I would love to see the 'notes' and 'outlines' that are credited as being the base for building this book. I enjoyed the prequels and like the tie-in back to that. Maybe Frank intended something similar, mabe he didn't -- it doesn't matter at this point. I'm glad they tackled it. Unfortunately, it devolved into silliness related to the characters they brought back, etc. Oh well ..... ...more info
  • The Enemy Closes In
    Sandworms of Dune (2007) is the second SF novel in the sequel duology, following Hunters of Dune. In the previous volume, on the no-ship Ithaca, the ghola of Paul Atreides stole a wafer of melange and initiated a bit of prescience. The other gholas continued to form close relationships. Duncan Idaho dumped all reminders of Murbella out the airlock.

    On Caladan, the ghola of Paul Atreides was kept separate from the ghola of Vladimir Harkonnen for his own safety. On Chapterhouse, the Mother Commander realized the extent of the ruin left by the Honored Matres and the Great Enemy. Elsewhere, the Enemy unleashed its endless fleets of warships.

    In this novel, twenty-one years after the escape from Chapterhouse, Jessica witnesses the birth of the Alia ghola onboard no-ship Ithaca. Alia is the first of the new series of gholas to be born. Forthcoming are Gurney Halleck, Serena Butler and Xavier Harkonnen.

    The Rabbi chastises Sheena for the new gholas. Althought Sheena had stopped the production of gholas from the axlotl tanks after an ominous dream, she had recently restarted the practice. The more conservative Bene Gesserits tried to convince her to totally discontinue these births, but near capture by Enemy Handlers had persuaded her otherwise.

    The Enemy is still looking for the no-ship. Omnius and Erasmus have widened their tachyon nets and monitor them attentively. Duncan Idaho has always slipped through their nets, but the thinking machines don't give up easily.

    On Chapterhouse, Murbella installs a disabled combat robot within her council chambers. The machine is harmless in itself, but reminds her of the relentless Enemy. It helps motivate the New Sisterhood in its plans to resist the machines.

    Murbella always finds someone who wants to flee the Enemy or cut deals with it. The deactivated robot reminds them that the Enemy cannot be outrun, outbreed or bribed. Nothing stops the ponderous approach of the Enemy ships.

    In this story, the Face Dancers infiltrate the personnel of the Ixians, the CHOAM merchants and even the New Sisterhood. Gradually the Sisters learn to identify the new Face Dancers, but Face Dancers replace the testers and continue undermining the resistance. Murbella thinks that the New Sisterhood is preparing to meet the Enemy, but the Face Dancers are making a mockery out of her efforts.

    Meanwhile, the Ithaca suffers from onboard saboteurs. Bene Gesserit truthtrancers question everyone onboard, but find nothing. Remote monitors are installed throughout the ship, but only infrequent glimpses of disguised saboteurs are produced. Then eight of the mines kept in the armory are found to be missing.

    This story keeps looking worse for those resisting the Enemy. The Face Dancers have produced their own gholas of Baron Harkonnen and Paul Atreides. The machine ships are overwhelming world after world. The Guild Navigators are dying and being replaced by computers under the control of Omnius. What else could go wrong?

    Well ... the efforts by a Tleilaxu Master to save the sandworms has resulted in armored predators that devastate the soostone beds on Buzzell. The warships and weapons being produced by the Guild are being sabotaged by Face Dancers. A ghola on the Ithaca is found to be a Face Dancer. Then the Enemy releases plagues on Chapterhouse.

    How can the thinking machines and Face Dancer be stopped? Will the old Empire be destroyed by the Enemy? Who IS the ultimate Kwisatz Haderach being sought by the Enemy and the Oracle of Time?

    This novel is filled with death and despair. Yet the conclusion is just a little too pat. Not quite as good as the originals.

    Recommended for Herbert fans and for anyone else who enjoys tales of interdimensional pursuits, deadly sisterhoods, and pompous thinking machines.

    -Arthur W. Jordin...more info
  • Final Analysis
    Sandworms ties a lot of loose ends going way back the the first prequel. Although not Frank Herbert, this is still a very gpood read.

    The only thing I miss is Who Killed Asmoden?...more info
  • Ultimate Kwisatz Haderach or Ultimate Failure?
    To be fair to Herbert and Anderson, Frank Herbert had a number of dum ideas. Among the insideous creations: face dancers; gholas; axlotl tanks; and worst of all Leto II becoming a sandworm.

    But what made Herbert's stories work; was that he was a great writer capable of taking the dumbest ideas and making something out of them. Something intriquing, something worth reading.

    In Sandworms of Dune, readers are left with the worst of Herbert's ideas, taken by SF's worst writers, who conspire to create a terrible book in an attempt to enhance the cash hoards of Hourse Herbert and House Anderson.

    In Sandworms of Dune, the no-ship continues through space with its gholas; Omnius marches through the empire destroying human worlds; the Bene Gesserit puts up a futile attempt to stop Omnius; the face dancers just infiltrate the humans making these worse; and the Oracle of Time has some mysterious purpose which is never revealed until the end. To about pg 475 of 549; everything goes against the humans.

    Then the ending is a complete disappointment with human victory hinging on the help of Erasmus and the Oracle of Time, both of whom don't have any motivation to help the humans bc they both hate them.

    Other than Duncan Idaho, no one on the Ithaca really does anything. And even he doesn't do much other than proclaim himself the Ultimate Kwisatz Haderach. Pretty stupid. In fact, the authors just ended up eliminating the ghola children bc they didn't know what to do with them.

    Overall, poor imagination; bad writing; and stupid ideas make this book a complete failure. ...more info