The Web    www.100share.com    Google
 
Raging Bull [Blu-ray]
List Price: $34.98

Our Price: $20.85

You Save: $14.13 (40%)

 


Product Description

Studio: Tcfhe/mgm Release Date: 02/10/2009 Run time: 129 minutes Rating: R

Martin Scorsese's brutal black-and-white biography of self-destructive boxer Jake LaMotta was chosen as the best film of the 1980s in a major critics' poll at the end of the decade, and it's a knockout piece of filmmaking. Robert De Niro plays LaMotta (famously putting on 50 pounds for the later scenes), a man tormented by demons he doesn't understand and prone to uncontrollably violent temper tantrums and fits of irrational jealousy. He marries a striking young blond (Cathy Moriarty), his sexual ideal, and then terrorizes her with never-ending accusations of infidelity. Jake is as frightening as he is pathetic, unable to control or comprehend the baser instincts that periodically, and without warning, turn him into the rampaging beast of the title. But as Roman Catholic Scorsese sees it, he works off his sins in the boxing ring, where his greatest athletic talent is his ability to withstand punishment. The fight scenes are astounding; they're like barbaric ritual dance numbers. Images smash into one another--a flashbulb, a spray of sweat, a fist, a geyser of blood--until you feel dazed from the pummeling. Nominated for a handful of Academy Awards (including best picture and director), Raging Bull won only two, for De Niro and for editor Thelma Schoonmacher. --Jim Emerson


Stills from Raging Bull (Click for larger image)





Customer Reviews:

  • Packs A Real Punch.
    Voted best film of the 1980s', Martin Scorsese's 1980 boxing tour de force "Raging Bull" is indeed one of the best movies ever made. Covering the life of famed boxer Jake La Motta (portrayed by Robert De Niro, whose physical transformation throughout the movie is as impressive as his performance, which is a contender for his best). Spanning 25 years through Jake's life, we see his rise and fall well documented. We see his struggle to keep his title, to stay fit, to maintain a solid family life as well as his relationship to his brother Joey (Joe Pesci). This is what true filmmamking is all about.

    The two disc special edition dvd is excellent, and I recommend this movie to all major film buffs, as it is a must have....more info
  • What makes a film a "classic"??
    I went into this film expecting a lot, since it was voted the best movie of the 80s, not to mention that it had Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci. But I can't say that was all that impressed with this film. First off, I couldn't find myself rooting for De Niro's character in the film. Maybe that was the point that the Scorsese was looking for, but I found myself not really caring for the Jake La Motta character. The character almost seemed like a schizophrenic at times, becoming angry, paranoid, and abusive for no apparent good reason. If this was the way the real Jake La Motta was, then I think he should've been in an insane aslyum. Also, I must say, that I think that Pesci has the better performance out of the two, in the film. But props to De Niro for gaining all that weight to play an out-of shape, aging boxer towards the end of the film. I seriously was shocked with De Niro's appearance. I also give credit to the filmmaking by Scorsesse. The choice to film in black and white was a good one. Their are some excellent shots during the boxing sequences, the one that stands out in my mind the most is the blood dripping off the rope of the ring. But to say that this movie is one of the best movies ever made is a huge overstatement. Really, its good, but not THAT great. I don't really understand what separates the "classic" films from just the "average" films. How do some many people connect to a film that I feel was maybe a bit better than average? Maybe you have to have an aquired taste to really appreciate movies like this one, maybe I need to watch it a few more time, or maybe I was just overexpecting too much, whatever the reason, at this time, I just don't see why this movie is so greatly praised....more info
  • I did like the special feature disk
    Deniro is one of the best actors of all time. Most all of Scorcese's films are jewels. But...
    I couldn't get through this film in one sitting. An overdose. The script seemed ad-libed and overfull. It was boring. It was depressing from start to finish with no sense of salvation for any of the characters, nor did they deserve it.
    I bought the special edition and absolutely enjoyed the special features, though it won't drive me back to watch the film again.
    "Mean Streets" and "Taxi Driver" did the same thing to me,,so perhaps I'm peculiar. ...more info
  • THIS BULL PACKS A ONE/TWO WALLOP ON DVD!
    "Raging Bull" (1980) is, bar none, the best work that director, Martin Scorsese has ever done in American cinema. Though not recognized as such at the time of the film's original release, and somewhat eclipsed in popularity by the later successes of "Casino" and "Goodfellas", it is in "Raging Bull that Scorsese really hits his stride. The film is a not-so-fictional, often critical and harsh account of real life boxing legend, Jake LaMotta (Robert DeNiro). Not that LaMotta would disagree with that assessment. In fact he would probably add that the film pales in comparison to the sort of lunk-headed jerk he was with his first wife, Vickie (Cathy Moriarty). Scorsese, admittingly not a fan of boxing at the start of production, sinks deep into the material and comes out swinging as the undisputed champion. The evocative black and white (except for rare color sequence) cinematography really captures the mood and feel of old time boxing news reels. Of course the other half that makes the story sparkle like no other sports movie before or since, and cannot be overstated, is Robert DeNiro's masterful performance as Jake. Gaining and losing some sixty pounds for the shoot, in every ounce of his being and delivery, DeNiro is LaMotta. The line between character and actor is so poignantly blurred that the performance stands out as genuine and raw in its reverence and sincerity to both LaMotta and the sport. Joe Pesci, who at this point in his career had almost decided that acting was not for him, establishes an indelible light as Joey LaMotta that would continue to burn in his many works since this one - both with and without Scorsese. The rest of the cast, hand picked by Scorsese for their non-actor-eque qualities, come off as real life patrons of the ring, an inspired artistic mileau that with each new viewing seems more like a hidden camera account of LaMotta than its fictional equivalent. DeNiro rightfully took home the Best Actor Oscar for "Raging Bull". Scorsese and the film were wrongfully overlooked.

    MGM/UA has given us a stunning new transfer of "Raging Bull". The black and white image is smooth, beautifully contrasted and very nicely balanced. Blacks are deep and rich. Whites are generally clean, except where Scorsese has deliberately toned down the contrast for artistic effect. Fine detail is fully realized throughout. There is no edge enhancement or other digital glitches for a picture quality that is staggeringly beautiful in all of its sustained and intense glory. The faded color sequences, deliberately rendered that way, are poignant snapshots of a private life that add yet another layer to the telling of this tale. The audio, remixed to 5.1, like the Raging Bull himself, packs an incredible one/two wallop. The sound field is engaging, intense and always on pitch. Extras include a string of interesting documentaries that chart the film from conception to post production. LaMotta as well as DeNiro are on hand to comment. There's even a side by side LaMotta to DeNiro fight sequence to compare styles in fighting. The film's theatrical trailer, a gallery and audio commentary round out the extras. ...more info
  • Raging indeed
    The Academy has been wrong on many occasions. This would be one of them. As interesting a drama as "Ordinary People" was Robert Redford's film can't hold a candle to the complex drama that was passed over for both best director and best picture. "Raging Bull" features Scorsese's cinematic gifts at their peak. The kinetic camera of Michael Chapman and Scorsese's unusual but powerful compositions capture the boxing ring in a way never quite seen before. He also captures the human element in the same way. Jake LaMotta's gift is his ability to punish himself for his sins. He can be pummeled by others and withstand every single massive punch of his opponents. Yes he can knock them out but it's also his ability to outlast them that makes LaMotta so difficult to beat in the ring. The boxing ring changes from a place of sport to a place of war for one man's soul. Robert DeNiro's brilliant portrayal of LaMotta earned him a well deserved Oscar but without Scorsese's sharp as nails direction and the rich imagery of Michael Chapman's cinematography, "Raging Bull" would just have been another biopic about a famous boxer. The difference between the deluxe two disc edition of "Raging Bull" and the single disc version comes down to the featurettes and documentary on disc two and the commentary tracks on disc one. Both the single disc and two disc versions feature the same top notch transfer.

    A beautiful, detailed transfer brings out the rich shadows, dark blacks and bright whites of Michael Chapman's cinematography. Presented in its original 1.85:1 aspect ratio for the first time this anamorphic transfer captures all the detail missing from the previous version released on DVD (which was reportedly cropped from the 1.33:1 TV version. Shot in black and white on high contrast film, the film retains it's grainy texture that added a sense of gritty reality to the original theatrical release. Presented in an enhanced Dolby Digital 5.1 and the original 2.0 Dolby Digital Surround soundtrack, the detailed soundtrack sounds terrific with virtually no compression issues and great presence.
    ---
    Extras: In Before the Fight the principle cast and crew discuss all the struggles that producers Chartoff and Winkler faced in making the movie. A project that DeNiro had first proposed to Scorsese when he was making Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. It's ironic that Scorsese who was never a big sports fan would make the ultimate boxing movie. Scorsese discusses how he was ultimately persuaded to make the movie by DeNiro (who had the idea of doing the physical transformation for LaMota as he ages from the very beginning). Luckily Chartoff and Winkler had produced Rocky. The duo used the success of their film as leverage to get Raging Bull.

    "In the Ring" focuses on the actual production issues they faced. Watching pre-production footage Scorsese came to the conclusion that Irwin Winkler's suggestion to shoot the film in black and white was perfect for capturing the "vintage" look of the era. Editor Thelma Schoonmaker points out that amazingly Raging Bull was shot with only one camera. Schoonmaker also points out the subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) differences between fights and how changing the design of the ring, the lighting and how the sequences reflected Jake's emotional state at the time. While the film was storyboarded, Scorsese primarily used them to help keep track of the way the film would ultimately look when put together.

    "In Outside the Ring" Pesci points out that the film was far from improvised. Schrader provided the dramatic structure and the actors would improvise during the rehearsal sessions and would then be, for the most part, written in stone. We learn much more about the dramatic scenes in this section with Cathy Morarity discussing everything from how the hairdresser would use corn syrup to keep her hair perfect. Chapman shot many of the color home movies then realized he couldn't shoot them with bad framing like typical home movies. The teamsters working on the production shot these sequences.

    "After the Fight" Pesci and Schoonmaker justify the extreme violence of the film by pointing out that Scorsese wasn't trying to glorify it but make it as ugly as possible particularly when it came to the fight sequences but also during the domestic fights between LaMotta and his family. Sound Effects editor points out some of the simple ideas that he used to highlight the differences between the fights sometimes during various punches such as the sound of a horse shuttering or an elephant braying during two intense fights. Warner would routinely burn the tapes he used for the sound effects at the end of each production forcing himself to create anew all over again with a new concept for each movie.

    "The Bronx Bull" features Jake LaMotta discussing seeing the movie for the first time. We then hear from film critics as to the reaction to the film. Schoonmaker talks about how the trade papers warned distributors NOT to book the film. Ironically, the critics asked about the film are British critics who seem to have the best appreciation for the film. The Bronx Bull duplicates many comments in the 20 minute featurettes included but, nonetheless, it provides additional background on the film not available elsewhere.

    "DeNiro vs. LaMotta" compares the reel world vs. the real world from still photos and archival footage. It shows the detail that Scorsese and DeNiro went into to recreate the look and feel of the real fights. We also get the original theatrical trailer and a promo trailer for the Rocky boxed set.

    If you elect to go for the single disc edition of the film, all you'll get is a bare bones presentation. It does, however, sport the best transfer to date of the film presented in the correct aspect ratio (widescreen image heighth and width). It's a pity that MGM chose not to include the commentary tracks on this edition as they would have provided information every bit as useful as the extras on the deluxe edition. Ironically, the image quality might be better in theory because there's less bit space being turned over to the commentary tracks.

    A superb movie that lost the Oscar to the fine film Ordinary People on a technicality (the repulsive violence alienated much of the Academy's core members), Raging Bull proves to be the deeper, richer film of the two. There's no doubt that both are classic films of a different sort but, truly, Raging Bull proves that if a classic is overlooked that time will repair the damage done.
    ...more info
  • The GREATEST of the DeNiro/Scorsese films!
    Of the eight films that Robert DeNiro and Martin Scorsese have made together, "Raging Bull" remains the GREATEST. Although all of them are GREAT. But how could they not be when you have a collaboration of America's GREATEST actor with one of the all-time GREAT directors.

    Anytime there is a paring of Joe Pesci and Robert DeNiro it's DYNAMITE! They just work SO WELL together. They are one of the GREAT duos in cinema history. I think by now everybody knows all the stories behind this movie. Including Robert DeNiro's famous weight gain of about 50 pounds so he could more resemble Jake Lamotta.

    I keep a list of my "50 Favorite Movies" and I MUST include one DeNiro film in it so I chose "Raging Bull". Premiere magazine said it better than I can when they said of DeNiro's performance: "DeNiro gives a performance that belongs in a museum".

    "That's entertainment"...more info
  • The Greatest Film of the Decade
    If there was ever a better film to be included in AFI's 10th Anniversary Top Ten list, I wouldn't believe it. This is filmmaking at it's best. Let me begin with the greatest actor working today.

    Whenever Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese get together it's cinematic gold. Only years prior they created the iconic character of Travis Bickle. Now, in 1980, they create another iconic screen character: Jake La Motta. Jake La Motta was a New York boxer known as The Raging Bull and Scorsese and De Niro brought him to screen better than any other boxing character in history. Robert De Niro's dedication to this role really shows as, even to this day, I look past the actor, as legendary as he is, and only see Jake La Motta, a troubled but talented man.

    I highly recommend this movie. It shows a character study second to almost none. Each one of Scorsese/De Niro's characters leave you with a different feeling. For eight movies now, (Mean Streets (Special Edition), Taxi Driver (Two-Disc Collector's Edition), New York, New York, Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, GoodFellas (Two-Disc Special Edition), Cape Fear (10th Anniversary Edition), and Casino), Scorsese and De Niro have created memorable characters. Jake La Motta just may well top the list.

    Plus, you can't go wrong with this DVD. Just as with the Two Disc Edition to Goodfellas, there's a commentary with Jake La Motta himself. And the featurettes are wonderful. Higly recommended...more info
  • Absolutley Brilliant
    One of my favorite movies. great acting, great directing, and great story. The true story of La Motta who is played by Robert De Niro who is possibly the best actor of his generation. Co-starring Joe Pesci as De Niro's brother; he has a great performance. Great film. Highly recommended!!!!...more info
  • Pound for Pound, the Greatest Filmmaker in the World
    I'm talking about Martin Scorsese. If he doesn't win an Oscar for directing The Aviator, and he probably won't, his legions of admirers won't be any more disappointed than they were in 1981 or 1991 when he was overlooked in favor of Robert Redford and Kevin Costner, respectively. (Redford is a class act and gave Martin a plum role in "Quiz Show," but as for Costner...) Anyway, Martin's award is this: tell just about anyone that he hasn't ever won, and they are flabbergasted. Stunned. And this movie, Raging Bull, is one of the reasons why. Having seen muddy, murky VHS copies and an OK DVD in past years, this version is a revelation. Disc 1 gives you the movie with 3 outstanding commentary tracks. Scorsese is always engrossing and entertaining with his remarks, and he always seems like just a big movie fan instead of an ego-driven director. Because Scorsese is, above all, a collaborator and not a dominator. He gives those who help him realize the vision plenty of credit. And that includes DeNiro and Pesci, in some of the most convincing and breathtaking acting you'll ever witness. People take these two actors for granted these days, and perhaps they've been overexposed, but remember--this was Pesci's first movie with DeNiro and Scorsese, and only his second movie overall. With all respect to Goodfellas and Casino, I think this is his best performace (Pesci). DeNiro--what can I or anyone say about this legendary portrayal that hasn't been said? Just marvel at it. One of the bravest performances committed to film, up there with Brando in Last Tango in Paris. This is where DeNiro, in fact, confirmed that he is Brando's heir, especially by recreating Marlon's On the Waterfront speech--"Could've been a contender."
    One interesting thing I learned in the commentaries and documentaries was that except for DeNiro, most of the actors in the movie were newcomers or relative unknowns. As an ensemble, they are brilliant, another example of Scorsese's directing brilliance.
    Special Features: For me, the commentary tracks are the best extras because they allow you to see the film from multiple perspectives. The documentaries are nice, but much of the information overlaps, a common problem in DVD documentaries.
    As for the quality of the movie transfer, I've seen the film probably two dozen times prior to this release, and I saw and heard new things as I watched the discs. For instance, the checkered pattern in Pesci's suit when he's talking to DeNiro by the swimming pool in the rain is sharp and vivid. That's just one small but significant example of how strong this new version is, aesthetically. I've always been, well, knocked out by the use of sound in this movie, and not only can you hear the effects better than ever, the documentaries and commentary explain how the effects were put together. Also, when you're not watching the movie, the packaging is beautiful. It's like having a new edition of a classic book with first rate binding and printing on your shelf. Sorry to gush, but this is almost a holy relic, something that fits with Scorsese's abiding theme of anguish and redemption through violence and blood.
    Favorite scenes: the second Robinson fight; the home movie sequence; Jake wins the title; Jake loses the title; and, a quirky one, fat Jake setting up a tower of champagne glasses and filling all of them by pouring champagne into the top glass and letting it overflow like a fountain. The unique touches like that are what set Scorsese/DeNiro apart and take this film into the atmosphere of the sublime.
    Also, before I forget, Nicholas Colasanto, later of Cheers where he played the beloved but not so bright Coach, shows up here as a neighborhood mobster who is both gentle and lethal. His scene with Pesci in the "Debonair Social Club" is brilliant, with Colasanto conveying barely restrained anger and frustration. Beautiful performance....more info
  • De Niro is brilliant!!!
    This film is one of American Cinema's finest works. This tragedy that is Jake LaMotta's life is brilliantly brought to life by Robert De Niro. Martin Scorcese's film of a lifetime, and arguably the best film ever made. Excellent performances by Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarity. The story is heartrending and heartwrenching at the same time. Highly recommended, and highly regarded by virtually every motion picture critic, in spite of the Academy's unjustified snub, only awarding two Oscars. This is an epic film that will...."for years, it'll remain in my thoughts." In conclusion, the screenplay is authentic in the best sense of the word, and in my opinion, Robert De Niro delivers the best performance, by an actor in a leading role, in the history of American Film....more info
  • The ultimate set--for the ultimate film
    Jake LaMotta:one of the most talented and successful boxers of his time. Also,one of the most turbulent boxers of his time,who's personal life would,eventually,work its way into his career.

    And,in "Raging Bull",all of that is covered here. Shortly after "Raging Bull" has opened(the opening scene may be in 1964,but that really doesn't take part until the end of the film),we are taken back to 1941,at the start of(Jake)La Motta's boxing career. Here,it all begins. Back and forth on "Raging Bull",we see several fights of Jake La Motta documented. Everything--the personal part of the fight--the violence and grittiness of the fight--and the fight itself--are rolled up into one. It's really quite impressive. It's like watching an actual fight,De Niro and all of the actors having their complete emotion rolled into it. The suspense and "beauty" really work well here. Not only did Robert Chartoff and Irwin Winkler(who won the Best Picture Oscar at the 1977 Academy Awards for "Rocky")produce "Raging Bull",the creativity/imagination of Martin Scorsese and the brilliant technique used by Scorsese(only one camera to film the boxing,as opposed to three,the usual method)really help a lot.

    The parts that focus on La Motta's personal life stand out quite well,also. With the screenplay,direction,and acting of Robert De Niro,you get to see who Jake La Motta was as a person:violent,angry,and crude,how he preferred to be with people "he liked",and how he preferred to be with people he "didn't like". "Raging Bull" succeeds on focusing on every other person of Jake La Motta's life and giving them enough recognition,without forgetting who the film is about. Joe Pesci can get annoying at times,but otherwise,the acting in "Raging Bull" is richly executed and contributes to the beauty of the film.

    It's worth noting that most of(minus about ten-thirteen minutes)of "Raging Bull" is shot in black and white. Some people may be iffy towards actions like this for a film. But,here,it's brilliant. Through the black and white,you get immersed in the 40's,50's,and 60's. You see what the life of Jake La Motta was completely like,the time period for which it was being documented the way it is helping a lot(history fans are in for a treat with this aspect of "Raging Bull"). "Raging Bull" actually has the characteristics of any "old" film from the time period in which it takes place. Yet,it still has the same,modern standards of any film made today.

    As you may have noticed,this is the two-disc,special edition of "Raging Bull". The title lives up to itself. The extras(three audio commentaries--one from Martin Scorsese and Editor Thelma Schoonmaker,the Cast and Crew Commentary,and the Storytellers Commentary,four behind-the-scenes feauturettes,and "The Bronx Bull" making-of documentary)really do spread one issue--learning about the making of the film--out. It's a very successful method. The eight bonus feautures let viewers of "Raging Bull" learn every aspect of the film being made(thumbs up for letting the real Jake La Motta have a helping hand),and all offer a fair amount of interesting and intruiging facts. The newsreel footage of Jake La Motta defending his title and the shot-by-shot comparison of Robert De Niro and Jake La Motta are impressive touches. The booklet is also quite nice with fun trivia/facts and some pictures that happen to stand out,while the actual "case" that holds the DVDS has a lot of creative and strong touches to it,as well.

    If you are a harcore,American Film institute film fan,"Raging Bull" is one film not to miss....more info
  • Good acting /Bad quality control
    The acting and the photography of the fight sequences are quite good. The problem lies in the quality of the DVD itself. The first copy I received was not playable and was returned. The second copy played ok, but the contrasts in volume between the conversation parts and the fight sequences were extreme. One could hadly hear the conversation portions and had to turn the volume up near its maximum. When the fight sequences occurred, the volume had to be turned back down. This soon became annoying. I am surprised that the anniversary edition had these problems.
    The special features disk was trouble-free and well worth watching....more info
  • Excellent!
    This is more than a 'sports' movie. Robert De Niro's Oscar performance as Jake LaMotta is still one of the best movies made. Scorsese helped bring out a very human side of a temperamental boxer who can't keep it together. The trouble in his personal life soon spills over into the ring. Cathy Moriarty and Joe Pesci also give wonderful talent to this story. The crumbling relationship between the brothers is especially heartbreaking when we realize Joey seems to be the last thin thread keeping LaMotta from unraveling. When that thread is lost, all hope for the brother's emotional recovery is lost as well.

    Chrissy K. McVay - Author...more info
  • One of those films
    Raging Bull is one of the most gripping, brutal, and magnetic films ever made. I myself am not a fan of boxing--I find it hard to like sports that I wouldn't enjoy playing myself. However, like or dislike of boxing doesn't really matter in this movie. This movie features Robert De Niro at his best (long before slumming for sub-par Hollywood comedies and slashers) as famed boxer Jake La Motta, whose massive insecurity makes Woody Allen look arrogant. Always worried about his wife leaving him, at one point grilling his brother (Joe Pesci, in his memorable screen debut) to see if he had, uh, indulged, La Motta was like an alternate history version of Brando from On The Waterfront, only with many more "F"-words--he wanted more than anything else to be the top, and then when he got there, he promptly lost everything, no longer having any worlds left to conquer. De Niro, of course, put on a ton of weight for the movie's end, and he delivers really bad stand-up in anonymous night clubs, having alienated nearly everyone in his path by his various demons and neuroses.

    This rise-and-fall picture was filmed, of course, by Martin Scorsese, and was definitely passed over for Oscars in its time (I won't diss Ordinary People because I loved that movie too). Maybe they should have been co-winners for Best Picture? Then again, Citizen Kane didn't win Best Picture either, and How Green Was My Valley was a much worse film than Ordinary People. This film, along with GoodFellas, represented Scorsese's apex--exciting, gut-wrenching, powerful cinema. He will probably get a few long overdue Oscars come the end of February, but it will be just like Paul Newman's win for The Color of Money (another Scorsese film)--an apology for not being nominated for more worthy work. Awards, though, don't matter--the work does. For an extraordinary film, look no further....more info
  • I say in a most humble fashion, Yes, it is the best!
    Dear Mr. DeNiro,

    I was in awe the first time I watched this movie, 25 years ago. I thought at the time you were cinematic perfection as an actor.

    Recently, I bought this special anniversary edition and my opinion is the same. You are awesome, sir.

    This DVD was issued with total care. The sound track was upgraded to today's standards of excellence. The comments from Mr. Scorsese and others, notably Mr. La Motta, were intelligent and very interesting. The final result of this edition is flawless.

    Your acting made me all emotional, Mr. DeNiro. At times I had tears streaming down my face, other times I was laughing, then emotional again, and so on. Your performance covered such a variety of human emotions that it is impossible to describe. We do not attempt to describe perfection, do we?

    What else can I add? Well, I believe your performance was an inspiration for all the people involved in this project. The result? A movie that will remain the best in its genre, frozen in time, way up there among the great ones.

    Thank you, sir. You will remain unforgettable....more info
  • A knockout
    Martin Scorsese's black-and-white film, an underdog in its day and a classic today, makes a rousing comeback in this double-disc set from MGM. All of the key participants return with blow-by-blow accounts of making the movie, including a repentant Jake La Motta. The DVD can go toe-to-toe with Warner's great "Goodfellas" DVD.

    Extras dig deep into Scorsese's methods and motivations, drawing heavily on the observations of Thelma Schoonmaker, his longtime editor who won an Oscar for the film. One of the DVD's best extras is a featurette in which Schoonmaker sits at her editing bay, breaking down the fight scenes, running film backward and forward as Robert De Niro does battle with the real-life boxers he faced during filming. The old champ La Motta says he went "a thousand" rounds with De Niro in preparation for filming. "I'm positive he could have fought professionally," La Motta says.

    A short but telling extra shows how carefully Scorsese and De Niro followed the script from La Motta's real fights. The 3-minute "Shot for Shot" intercuts footage from the actual and movie fights, the drama heightened by Frank Warner's jungle-beast sound effects from "Raging Bull."

    The DVD's widescreen anamorphic images (1.85:1) look sensational, with concussion blacks and silky grays across a distinct scale. The Dolby Digital (5.1) sounds all right, with plenty of punch, but requires some bobbing and weaving with the volume control to catch all of the dialog but not be blasted out in louder moments.

    Most viewers will be satisfied with the film's history as told on disc 2's quartet of featurettes directed by Laurent Bouzereau. They're solid pieces, but viewers may tire of sitting through opening titles and end credits as they navigate the short films, obviously separated at birth. De Niro participates in the featurettes, not the commentaries.

    Scorsese and Schoonmaker's commentary will be familiar to owners of "Raging Bull" laserdiscs. Their talks were recorded separately, and include some lengthy silences, but there's no shortage of content or insight.

    There are three commentary tracks. A lot of material gets repeated across the hours of extras presented here, and in one or two cases audio comments seem simply ported over to the featurettes. The frenetic trailer kicks ass. ...more info
  • The Bronx Bull Is Back Now!!!
    For the past few years I felt this film has been forgotten a bit. Now it is re-released on DVD in a special 2 disc form. The bonus disc is so great and well worth the money alone! Almost better than the film. If you loved the Rocky movies or if you loved the mob films like The Godfather or Goodfella's, This is the best of both worlds for you!! Boxing and the mob back in the day WERE hand in hand. This real life story shows that. However, Jake LaMotta never wanted to sell out or take a dive for the fixed money. You can still find an old copy of this film on DVD but this brand new 2 disc version is the way to go. ...more info
  • BRUTAL, AND MESMERIZING
    Only one other film on fighting has the raw power of this masterpiece ( MILLION DOLLAR BABY ). De Niro is simply stunning in his portrayal of Jake LaMotta, and is pretty nearly matched by Joe Pesci, and Cathy Moriarty ( as, respectively, his brother, and the young girl that becomes his wife ). RAGING BULL is an extremely violent film, that is stark, and intense, and the fight sequences are astounding in their graphic brutality. Scorsese ( who was once again robbed of an Oscar for directing yet another classic ) somehow manages to make this film both incredibly moving, and singularly beautiful, despite the savagery of its main character. A must for De Niro, or Scorses fans....more info
  • Yes, savage violence can be a beautiful thing
    Generally, I am not a huge fan of special edition - extra DVD editions. However, Raging Bull's special edition is an exception. In this age where movie scripts seem jerry-rigged over night and movies tend to rely so heavily on celebrity recognition and special effects, the inside perspectives of those who made "Raging Bull" is so refreshing. Commentaries by Martin Scorsese (director), Frank Warner (supervising sound effects editor), and Thelma Schoonmaker (editor) are especially revealing as to the attention to detail and meticulous care that went into "Raging Bull." After hearing their interviews, you can truly feel that these artists went through emotional and professional growth over the production of this film. Schoonmaker literally cries while describing the emotional effects the movie had on her. Warner ceremoniously burns the tapes of his sound effects after the movie, because he feels they belong to the movie and should never be used again.

    With respect to the actors, Cathy Moriarty and Joe Pesci provided the most interesting angles. Pesci, a childhood actor, had given up on acting and was working in a restaurant when approached by DeNiro and Scorsese to do the film. Obviously, his career was rejuvenated after his role as Jake's brother. Also, Raging Bull took Moriarty from being just a neighborhood girl to an Oscar-nominated celebrity for her role as Vickie LaMatta. Previously, she had had some undefined aspirations to be an actress, but had no professional experience; only high school and dinner theater. DeNiro does provide interviews, but his comments are the least inspired, despite the entire project being made primarily at his persuasion.

    As for the movie itself, it is a masterpiece. Made in the enthusiasm for boxing movies in the wake of 1977's "Rocky," Raging Bull puts the sport into a much less glamorous light. Unlike Rocky Balboa, who had a soft loveable side outside the ring, Jake LaMatta was a tyrannical, paranoid, hostile tragic hero outside the ring as well as inside. On a self-destructive path, he destroys everything that is important to him. Although Rocky depicted some of boxing's gruesome side ("cut me Nick"), Scorsese clearly showcases boxing at its ferocious and savage worst. Blood spurts, noses get crushed. Between rounds, Jake is sponged off with bloody water. Frank Warner uses animal sounds during punches to accentuate the bestial nature of the sport.

    Great movie. Nobody can swear as well as DeNiro, and he lets them fly throughout. Gory, graphic and tragic, but somehow lyrical, emotional and deeply provoking, Raging Bull is an all time masterpiece. Despite what is in the theatres nowadays, this movie reminds you that movies can still be artistic and made with loving care. Not to be just another notch on each participants "filmography," the special edition reveals how much this movie changed the lives of the people involved. In today's movie industry, it is hard to foresee another movie like this being made. If you feel jaded about contemporary movies, then "Raging Bull" will rejuvenate your interest in movies as an art form again.
    ...more info
  • A triumph of American cinema; a landmark if ever there was one...
    Considered by many to be the greatest film of the 80's, and ranking number four on AFI's top 100 greatest American films, `Raging Bull' has become a landmark in American cinema. Martin Scorsese will always be remembered for this film, and rightfully so, for `Raging Bull' is not merely a sports film or merely just a drama but `Raging Bull' captures something rare, something monumental. `Raging Bull' captures the essence of a man and the time in which he lived with such precise perfection that the audience is transported into this mans life, walking in his shoes and fighting his personal (as well as professional) battles.

    There are many facets to this movie that help elevate it to `masterpiece' levels of brilliance. First you have the flawless direction by Martin Scorsese. In my humble opinion this is probably his finest moment behind the lens. Scorsese is often praised for his `gangster' films, most notably `Good Fellas', but in my eyes it will always be his weightier work that shines the brightest. Films like `Taxi Driver' and `Raging Bull' are truly Scorsese's crowning achievements. His decision to shoot the film in classic black and white film is another bonus to an already fantastic film. It adds layers of honesty and humanity that are at times lost in the glitzy colors flooding the screen. Stripping it down in this way allows the rawness and realness of these people to shine through ten fold. Scorsese is also responsible for capturing some of the greatest scenes of violence ever recorded on film. Of course this is violence within the ring, calculated and controlled violence, but Scorsese displays it in such a sporadic and brutal way that the audience is in a way pummeled mercilessly by the images attacking the screen. The only other director I've seen able to capture this same intensity was Ron Howard in `Cinderella Man'. Others have tried, and they have done so admirably, but truly none have reached this level of perfection. Scorsese was also able to capture the feel and mood of the era in which `Raging Bull' takes place. The way individuals interact with one another, the dialog and the emotional construction is a marvelous representation of the time period as well as the subject. Scorsese had a real grasp of what he was attempting to deliver, and the end result is nothing short of perfection. Couple this with Michael Chapman's glorious cinematography, rich and vibrant despite it's grit and lack of color, and you have a film that looks as brilliant as it plays out.

    Honestly though, no matter how brilliant Scorsese was, `Raging Bull' would be nothing without Robert De Niro. As the tortured and violent boxer Jake La Motta, De Niro ignites the screen with fiery determination and complete control and understanding of his character. This is one of those moments where the actor is so lost within his character that you forget you are watching a motion picture. These are the moments that cement De Niro as one of the greatest actors to ever grace the big screen. Sure, his recent film choices have been less than desirable, but there is no denying that in his prime he was better than anyone has ever been.

    De Niro has help in the form of Cathy Moriarty and Joe Pesci. Pesci is flawless as Jake's devoted brother Joey. From his very first scene onward you are drawn into his character and become invested in him. Pesci is always on top of his game when playing the scheming and loud mouthed gangster (i.e. `Casino' and his Oscar winning performance in `Good Fellas') but here he is more subdued and subtle and I think this adds a layer of realism to his performance. In my opinion, this may be his finest performance to date. Cathy Moriarty is also stunning as Vickie, La Motta's second wife. The blonde bombshell gives De Niro a run for his money and proves she is more than just a pretty face. Her attachment to her character is obvious and certainly pays off in the end.

    `Raging Bull' masterfully interweaves La Motta's violent profession with his violent persona, giving us a glimpse into a man who took his work home with him in the most literal of senses. There is no flaw to be found here, for Scorsese crafts a marvelous portrait of a man destroyed by his own carnal weaknesses. Looking back, I don't think it can be stressed enough how marvelous the year of 1980 really was. All five Best Picture nominees were deserving of their nominations, and while `Raging Bull' is not my favorite of the five (in my humblest of opinions `The Elephant Man' was the Best Picture of 1980) there is no doubt in my mind that Martin Scorsese deserved that directing Oscar one-thousand times over. Regardless, there is no denying the fact that `Raging Bull' is a flawless film, a marvel, a spectacle and most definitely one of the greatest films ever made....more info
  • Outstanding
    You have a great screenplay, great direction, and some outstanding actors. All together, it makes one of the greatest films of the 80's and a top ten of all time for me. The story of Jake LaMotta is fantastic because Jake is such an interesting character. Brutal and sad at times, you never know whether you should hate Jake or feel sorry for him. This is Deniro's finest performance. The actual boxing scenes aren't always as realistic as I would like, but that is the only minor quibble I have....more info
  • Scorsese & DeNiro are the greatest team ever!
    Well i've been waiting ever since I got my 1st dvd player for this one to get the "Special Edition" treatment! I was very disapointed in 2000 when Scorsese didn't release a 20th Anniversary Edition, but the extra 5 yr wait was worth it!

    These dvd's contain an incredible collection of special features!
    The commentaries by different producers/writer/actors is incredible(I just wish a few more people could have done them too!)but my absolute fave feature is "LaMotta vs DeNiro" which gives you an UNCANNY look at these 2 men boxing. The attention to detail is scary by Scorsese & DeNiro's preperation to actually spend a year learning how to box is truly beyond belief!
    He boxed over 1000 rounds w/LaMotta alone! LaMotta always said DeNiro could have actually been a vg Middleweight, even in his late 30's when he learned how to box & coming from a World champ that did defeat the greatest boxer ever(Suar Ray Robinson)that's a GREAT compliment, & a true one!

    Indeed it is a crime that Scorsese never wins an Oscar, as I don't think he ever will. However when his films like this come out he always wins more prestigious awards(New York & other filmwriters awards, The Cannes award, ect ect,)& will likely get a lifetime achievment award which will be the Academy's way of saying, "Oh excuse us! WE SCREWED UP!"

    I never understood how a film can win the "Best Piture of the Year" but the Director not win?? Who directed the damned movie? A grip?????

    Anyway, the greatest movie ever made has now, finally gotten the treatment it deserves! What a joy to watch! If you don't own a copy yet but want to see the finest performances by the finest actors & a fabulous soundtrack & film direction the way only Scorsese can do it then buy this dvd! Scorsese will never be a "Hollywood" director, but that's fine w/me Marty! Keep on giving us your New York, the REAL one! Thank you for this masterpeice!...more info
  • A Work of Art
    I haven't seen this movie since it opened. I think it was dark, confusing and overwhelming. I tended to avoid it over the years because of what I perceived as its length and how good the movie really was. Seeing it now is a revelation. I am able to comprehend it more and found it wonderful. (I was a teenager in 1980.) Robert De Niro does a wonderful job as Jake LaMotta, one of the great boxers but an ignorant man who was brutal in all areas of his life. The story is laid out without explanation from the filmmakers. We don't empathize with the character nor totally despise him. Jake LaMotta is who is and no one else. Still, the movie is a statement in itself for making films in a different way and as art. Martin Scorcesse deliberately makes a film that defies the rules in much the same way Jake La Motta found himself defying rules in order to box. He constantly breaks down barriers and walls and never gives up. People reject him and leave him but he doesn't stop. I think Scorcesse sees that in himself in making this film. Even to film in black and white would have caused problems with the film studios. What a wonderful film it is. ...more info
  • Genius Brutal Film of a Famous Boxer
    "Raging Bull", released in 1980, is truly one of the greatest films released that year, receiving eight Oscar nominations and winning two (Best Actor and Best Editing). It stars Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, and Joe Pesci. Director Martin Scorsese uses his infamous genius to create this phenomenal film of world-famous boxer Jake LaMotta. This true story explores the brutal side of his life from fighting his inner demons through destructive behavior to his challenges in the ring. All have lasting effects within himself, his friends, and his family. Through these chains of events, serious consequences arise that change his future. This powerful scenery leads to a powerful conclusion. Therefore, this is not just a boxing film. This is a powerdrama.

    Through the writing and the physical aspects lies one of Scorsese's best works in his long career. Unfortunately, he has yet to win an Oscar for Best Director despite multiple nominations. This unique film offers its hardhitting message through words, violence, blood, and graphic images. The overall black-and-white theme intentially explores a deeper side of Jake LaMotta's madness. Scorsese's signature directing style explores the psychological themes deeply without distracting the elaborate setting. The overall result offers a deeper examination of LeMotta's life and turbulances. Scorsese used this similar style to give "Taxi Driver" (1976) its unique genius result. However, "Raging Bull" takes this to the next level. This style has since influenced upcoming film directors and their films, including "Pi" (1998), "Requiem For a Dream" (2000), and "L.I.E." (2001).

    The amazing cast adds their emotional value to this film, namely Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, and Joe Pesci. All received an Oscar nomination. Words can't possibly describe De Niro's groundbreaking performance as Jake LaMotta. His madness never loses its severity. Such acting style gives new meaning to the term "raging bull", hense the film title. Moriarty makes a strong debut in her emotional performance as Vickie, LaMotta's wife. Her reactions as a battered and neglected wife are acted beautifully. Pesci also makes a strong debut as Joey, LaMotta's brother and manager. His signature aggressive acting style offers the extended brutality of this film, yet keeping De Niro in the spotlight. This similar style made him a household name through the 1980's and the 1990's.

    Such overall quality makes "Raging Bull" one of the most legendary boxing films released. This unique film is sure to leave audiences speechless as it has since its theatrical release. Other boxing films that fans may like are "The Hurricane" (1999), "Million Dollar Baby" (2004), and "Rocky" (1976)....more info
  • Classic comes to blu!!!!
    Raging Bull is an instant classic and is imo the best of the tandem of Scorsese and DeNiro's work. Now it's a must own blu ray. The picture quality is the best to be released for this film to this date and the sound quality is 4.5/5 stars. Hearing the score in HD is wondeful and this blu ray gives us a widescreen perspective. Some people may not like the man but you can't go wrong with watching this film in widescreen how it seems like it was meant to be. What an amazing emotional journey Raging Bull takes us through as we see all of Jake's demons as he tries to be the best of the best. A truly great charachter study of a controlling man struggling to reach his ideal. Joe Pesci is great as Jake's brother and Cathy Moriarty is beautiful. 5/5 and one of the top 15 films ever made. A true classic. ...more info
  • Wonderful Movie, Great DVD
    This movie was voted best movie of the decade for a reason. De Niro is perfect. The supporting cast is perfect. The fight scenes are perfect. I didn't cringe during Goodfellas, but some of the fight scenes here are just brutal.

    The picture on the DVD is perfect, as nothing is lost in the black and white. The only issue with the DVD is the fact that the sound drops alot between fights. De Niro sounds like he's mumbling occasionaly, but that can be fixed by turning up the sound on your TV a little bit louder than normal....more info
  • Raging Bull -Blu-ray Info
    Version: U.S.A / FOX-MGM / Region A, B, C(?)
    Aspect ratio: 1.85:1
    MPEG-4 AVC / BD+ / High Profile 4.1
    Running time: 2:09:03
    Movie size: 36,50 GB
    Disc size: 45,01 GB
    Total bit rate: 37.71 Mbps
    Average video bit rate: 28.48 Mbps

    DTS-HD Master Audio English 3829 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3829 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
    DTS Audio French 768 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 768 kbps / 16-bit
    Dolby Digital Audio Portuguese 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio Spanish 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio Turkish 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps / Dolby Surround
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps

    Subtitles: English SDH, Mandarin, Cantonese, French, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, Spanish, Thai
    Number of chapters: 36

    #Commentary by Director Martin Scorsese and Editor Thelma Schoonmaker
    #Cast and Crew Commentary with Irwin Winkler, Robbie Robertson, Robert Chartoff, Theresa Saldana, John Turturro, Frank Warner, Michael Chapman and Cis Corman
    #Storytellers Commentary with Mardik Martin, Paul Schrader, Jason Lustin and Jake Lamotta
    #Raging Bull: Before the Fight (The Writing, the Casting and Preproduction) (26m:08s)
    #Raging Bull: Inside the Ring (The Choreography of the Fight Scenes) (14m:49s)
    #Raging Bull: Outside the Ring (Behind-the-Scenes Stories on the Making of the Film) (27m:19s)
    #Raging Bull: After the Fight (The Sound Design, the Music, the Impact of the Film) (16m:01s)
    #The Bronx Bull (Making of Documentary) (27m:52s)
    #De Niro Vs LaMotta (Shot by Shot Comparison in the Ring) (3m:48s)
    #La Motta Defends Title (Newsreel Footage) (0m:57s)
    #Original Theatrical Trailer (3m:55s)...more info
  • Classic comes to blu!!!!
    Raging Bull is an instant classic and is the best of the tandem of Scorsese and DeNiro's work. Now it's a must own blu ray. The picture quality is the best to be released for this film to this date and the sound quality is 4.5/5 starts. What an amazing emotional journey Raging Bull takes us through as we see all of Jake's demons as he tries to be the best of the best. A truly great charachter study of a controlling man struggling to reach his ideal. 5/5 and one of the top 15 films ever made. A true classic. ...more info
  • This movie was stupid.
    I'm a boxing fan and train often but I have no idea why people like this movie. It's a story about a cocky, arrogant jerk who likes to abuse the people around him both mentally and physically. Most of the movie is of him degrading women, screaming profanities to them and hitting them. In one scene he beats his own brother badly in a jealous rage, stomping him and then slugs his own 20 year old wife. The only thing I learned from this movie is that Jake Lamotta was one horrible person. This movie does nothing for boxing. It basically just shows boxers as violent wife beaters who can take punches. Even the fight scenes do nothing to showcase the art of boxing. ...more info
  • A Well Shot and acted movie about an unworthy individual.
    Alright the guy could take a punch and even give a few back but he beat women, was an overall f-up, and basically contributed nothing to society which should be remembered. The direction and acting are top notch but without a worthy individual to tell about the end result is a big "so what?" I know I'll piss off all the Italians who view this guy as some sort of hero but he represents everything that was wrong with this subculture during this time in American history. BRAVO for the realism!!...more info
  • Raging Bull My Review
    Raging Bull, is a good period piece, it shows why Boxing lost popularity. From the kitchen scene near the start till the end Raging Bull is emotional and believable. The worst beating doesnt come in the ring. The way the fights went made me hate the promoters and Ray Robinson. Its hard to like Jake but.......more info
  • Robert De Niro does his magic.
    Raging Bull directed by Martin Scorsese is probably his best film to date. Filmed in gorgeous black and white, Raging Bull tells the story of true-life boxer Jake La Motta played brilliantly by De Niro. He gained a lot of weight for this role, he is truly unrecognizable towards the end of the film, but besides that his blistering performance earned him his second Oscar, his portrayal is both frightening and riveting. This is one film every aspiring filmmaker should see, one of the essentials. Enjoy!...more info
  • An eloquent film about inarticulate people
    Actor Robert DeNiro and director Martin Scorcese portray heavyweight champion Jake LaMotta as a man consumed by his fear of women, the vulnerability they can instill in him, and the ferocity of his resulting rage. He uses the boxing ring as an arena for expressing that rage and, occasionally, atoning for his sins. This extraordinary film shows us how an inarticulate brute makes a shambles of his life but reaches a degree of self-awareness that redeems him. The final sequences, in which we see him making his living by reciting from literature before small audiences, have a kind of squalid sadness to them but also a quiet dignity. A man who once lived by his fists and animal instincts alone now makes his living with his mind, and we can sense that he has learned the value of patience and forgiveness....more info
  • Raging Bull -Blu-ray Info
    Version: U.S.A / FOX-MGM / Region A, B, C(?)
    Aspect ratio: 1.85:1
    MPEG-4 AVC / BD+ / High Profile 4.1
    Running time: 2:09:03
    Movie size: 36,50 GB
    Disc size: 45,01 GB
    Total bit rate: 37.71 Mbps
    Average video bit rate: 28.48 Mbps

    DTS-HD Master Audio English 3829 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3829 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
    DTS Audio French 768 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 768 kbps / 16-bit
    Dolby Digital Audio Portuguese 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio Spanish 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio Turkish 448 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 448 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps / Dolby Surround
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps
    Dolby Digital Audio English 224 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 224 kbps

    Subtitles: English SDH, Mandarin, Cantonese, French, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, Spanish, Thai
    Number of chapters: 36

    #Commentary by Director Martin Scorsese and Editor Thelma Schoonmaker
    #Cast and Crew Commentary with Irwin Winkler, Robbie Robertson, Robert Chartoff, Theresa Saldana, John Turturro, Frank Warner, Michael Chapman and Cis Corman
    #Storytellers Commentary with Mardik Martin, Paul Schrader, Jason Lustin and Jake Lamotta
    #Raging Bull: Before the Fight (The Writing, the Casting and Preproduction) (26m:08s)
    #Raging Bull: Inside the Ring (The Choreography of the Fight Scenes) (14m:49s)
    #Raging Bull: Outside the Ring (Behind-the-Scenes Stories on the Making of the Film) (27m:19s)
    #Raging Bull: After the Fight (The Sound Design, the Music, the Impact of the Film) (16m:01s)
    #The Bronx Bull (Making of Documentary) (27m:52s)
    #De Niro Vs LaMotta (Shot by Shot Comparison in the Ring) (3m:48s)
    #La Motta Defends Title (Newsreel Footage) (0m:57s)
    #Original Theatrical Trailer (3m:55s)...more info
  • Scorsese's Brilliant Depiction of One Man's Life Journey...
    The opening scene is shot in slow motion with Jake La Motta (Robert De Niro) dancing on the balls of his feet in a boxing ring while wearing a robe with the hood over his head. The area in which the boxing ring is located is full of cigarette smoke, as occasional flashes of cameras try to capture the moment before a fight. Jake throws some punches into the smoky air while soothing music is played throughout the scene. It seems absurd to play this kind of music to boxing, yet the music continues. Despite the absurdity of the music it will make sense to the audience as the story unfolds. The blood red title, Raging Bull, appears as a bad omen between the ropes of the boxing ring while Jake keeps dancing on the balls of his feet. Shortly after, the screen shows the year to be 1964 and the name of the city as New York. The audience can hear Jake's voice saying, "I remember those cheers, they still ring in my ears, for years they remain in my thoughts, `cause one night, I took off my robe and what'd do? I forgot to wear shorts."

    After the recital by Jake in 1964, the film turns into one monumental flashback beginning in 1941, which is unlocked by a powerful hook into Jake's face. This punch into Jake's face has a symbolic value as to how he sees the world. Hubris comes to mind when one thinks of Jake's persona, a man with exaggerated pride and confidence. Overtly he walks the talk that he backs up with his two lethal fists and an attitude that can take any kind of beating. His attitude also projects an image that he needs no body, as he punishes those who he fights in the ring through murderous punches. Through boxing Jake dreams of getting a title match, but his attitude seems to turn people away from him. His brother, Joey (Joe Pesci), tries hard to get him the match while he tries to sway him to do what the people in power want him to do.

    In the world of boxing testosterone flood every aspect of life, as hurting someone is what brings home the bread. Successful boxers are treated like gold and their aggressiveness is nurtured to perfection. Hostility is needed to destroy the opponent while compassion and sympathy are being perceived as a weakness. Everything surrounds this attitude in boxing, and Jake is the best there is at hurting others. Domination is what he brings with him wherever he goes--even home to his small apartment, where his wife slaves for him in front of the stove. De Niro does a magnificent job in being perceived as a male chauvinistic pig in his role as Jake when he uses his wife as a verbal punching bag.

    When Jake first sees the neighborhood girl Vickie (Cathy Moriarty) he falls in love at first sight. When Jake's wife finds out about it she leaves him, which probably was the best thing for her, and he begins to date Vickie instead. Their relationship is not based on mutual respect and commitment, but more on Jake's bestial desires. During the time when Jake sees Vickie he continues to box and dream for a title match. However, no one is willing to give him one. Something happens at home where Jake does not give into Vickie's desires, as Jake does not want it to affect his boxing. Nonetheless, in between fights Jake and Vickie get married. The moments between fights, including the wedding, are depicted through the only color scenes in the film, seemingly shot by a personal camera without sound, but symbolically it offers some of the happiest moments in Jake's life.

    Through Jake's attitude he does not get any chance at the title, and because of the way he has been knocking out his opponents no one wants to box him. When Jake finds out that Joey has set up a fight against a younger and lighter boxer, he gets upset. This moment turns the whole film in a new direction, as Jake's inability to understand women is magnified. His view of women seems to be heavily colored by his upbringing where women were supposed to serve the men while in a social context they are perceived as either virgins or whores. In addition, Jake must begin to diet which probably plays further tricks with his mind while he is working out to get into top shape for a possible title match. His aggressiveness turns into jealousy and distrustful paranoia, as he begins to watchfully observe Vickie's every move while he is around. Eventually, Jake begins to imagine that Vickie is doing something dishonest, which explodes on the day when he asks his brother if he has slept with her.

    It turns into a downward spiraling affair for Jake, as he loses everything he has worked so hard to gain in the boxing ring, the only place where it seems that he fits in--a place where he feels that he is in harmony. This brings back the notion of the soothing music in the opening of the film. Nonetheless, Jake learns his lesson, but at a very high price. As the film comes full circle, the audience is brought back to New York in 1964. In the beginning of the film, the audience can see the same poster that was shown in the beginning of the film, which showed Jake La Motta's name on the top and botton stating "Tonight 8:30". This is the second time the audience gets to see the whole poster, which will provide some insight to what Jake La Motta gained throughout the film.

    Martin Scorsese directs a powerful film that deals with wisdom, identity, and love through boxing. Using visual symbolism and other ways he directed many of the scenes. The black and white photography makes it feel like minimalism, yet all scenes are very rich in details, but not excessively thanks to Scorsese's meticulous approach to what is in the frame of the camera. De Niro's performance was brilliant and well worth the Oscar it won, as he must have gained a tremendous amount of weight during time it took to make the film. The cinematography is excellent by Michael Chapman, as it helps highlight the emotional moments and the brutal fight scenes. When all the cinematic aspects of filmmaking come together in Raging Bull it offers a truly brilliant cinematic experience, which will leave the audience in awe for a very long time. ...more info
  • Bull on blu is a knock-out!
    This is a blu-ray for film lovers. The film grain has been reproduced beautifully. There is some minor ringing on a few high contrast edges, but other than that nit-pick, this looks just like watching it at the movie theater, but with a pristine print. Looks just as Scorcese intended in gorgeous black and white. One of the greatest films has been given a great restoration and now looks its very best on blu-ray! ...more info
  • Are you kidding?
    How this movie lost to "Ordinary People" at the Oscars is beyond me. Comparatively speaking, "Ordinary People" sucked. And Bobby Deniro should have won the award for "Best Actor"...not to mention most of the supporting cast winning awards also.

    Nonetheless, being heralded as the best movie of the 80's is a well-deserved accolade. Movie aficianodos who don't have this film in their library....need to find a new hobby....more info